Asian Dowitcher Leads Shanghai Spring-Mig Birding Pageant!

On 21-24 April 2016, teaming up with Jan-Erik Nilsén and Michael Grunwell, Elaine Du and I noted 110 species. Our birding ranged from the inner city of Shanghai (Zhongshan Park, Century Park) to the coast at Cape Nanhui. The highlight of this spring-mig bird pageant was Asian Dowitcher at Nanhui. The dowitcher was in a pool that also held 11 Chinese Egret. Nanhui also gave us endangered Black-faced Spoonbill, Far Eastern Curlew, and Great Knot and near-threatened Red Knot and Curlew Sandpiper. Among the other uncommon to scarce passage migrants were 4 Greater Sand Plover, 2 Pechora Pipit, 4 Brown-headed Thrush, 2 Siberian Blue Robin, 3 Siberian Rubythroat, and Citrine Wagtail. Joining them were 5 Terek Sandpiper, 3 Temminck’s Stint, 12 Long-toed Stint, 3 Eurasian Wryneck, 2 Eastern Crowned Warbler, 4 Japanese Thrush, 2 Eyebrowed Thrush, Mugimaki Flycatcher, 2 Blue-and-white Flycatcher, macronyx Eastern Yellow Wagtail, and 3 Tristram’s Bunting. We had impressive numbers (ca. 3180) of Barn Swallow, and picking through the clouds of hirundines we coaxed out 3 Pale/Sand Martin and 4 Red-rumped Swallow. Near-threatened Marsh Grassbird were singing in the reed bed at 30.866006, 121.939614. Near the grassbirds were Brown Crake, Reed Parrotbill, and Oriental Reed Warbler. A quick trip to Zhongshan Park on Thursday netted Narcissus Flycatcher and Yellow-rumped Flycatcher, and at Century Park on Friday we had Indian Cuckoo.

Pechora Pipit, Nanhui, 24 April 2016. The prominent wing bars, distinct stripes on mantle, and contrasting buffish breast and whitish belly are readily visible in my photos.
Pechora Pipit, Nanhui, 24 April 2016. The prominent wing bars, distinct stripes on mantle, and contrasting buffish breast and whitish belly are readily visible in my photos. (Craig Brelsford)

A Swede based in Beijing, Jan-Erik is an experienced birder and a friend. I have partnered with Jan-Erik in Qinghai (2014) and in Hulunbeier, Inner Mongolia (2015). Last year he introduced me to the Beijing-area birding hot spots.

Among Jan-Erik’s many strengths is his ear. When the rain finally let up on Sunday, Jan-Erik and I were walking between microforests on the Nanhui sea wall. “Pechora Pipit!” Jan-Erik cried. On a windy day, Jan-Erik’s sensitive ear had detected the hard, clicking call of a distant Pechora. I missed this one, but my adrenaline was running, and I ran back to our rented Buick, driven by Elaine. I put together my 600 mm lens and Nikon D3S, which had lain dormant throughout the rainy Saturday and Sunday morning. “Record-shot time!” I said to my wife. Almost as soon as I had set up my camera, I found another Pechora atop a tree. I had not seen Pechora Pipit since 2010. Jan-Erik’s strong hearing skills made the rare view possible.

Chinese Egret Egretta eulophotes, Nanhui, 24 April 2016. This is quite a different bird from Little Egret Egretta garzetta. Note the dagger-like orange bill and blue-grey lores.
Chinese Egret Egretta eulophotes, Nanhui, 24 April 2016. This is quite a different bird from Little Egret Egretta garzetta. Note the dagger-like orange bill and blue-grey lores. (Craig Brelsford)

The teamwork continued later that day. At the dowitcher spot (30.877779, 121.955465), Elaine, using the spotting scope and scanning the pond below us, cried out, “Dowitcher! Maybe Asian!” Elaine had never seen Asian Dowitcher, but Michael Grunwell’s fascination with this bird had prepared Elaine for the possibility of encountering the species. Jan-Erik and I ran back, and I enjoyed my first-ever views of the near-threatened species. Great spot, Elaine!

My two greatest birding mentors, Michael Grunwell (L) and Jan-Erik Nilsén (R), photographed with me by my greatest birding partner, Elaine Du. Dishui Lake Metro Station, Shanghai, 23 April 2016.
My two greatest birding mentors, Michael Grunwell (L) and Jan-Erik Nilsén (R), photographed with me by my greatest birding partner, Elaine Du. Dishui Lake Metro Station, Shanghai, 23 April 2016. (Elaine Du)

Jan-Erik arrived late Thursday night. On Friday we did light birding at Century, noting 29 species. On Saturday and Sunday I had the pleasure of introducing Jan-Erik to Nanhui. We noted 99 species over the weekend, and we had the added pleasure of having Michael Grunwell join us Saturday. Despite the rain, I have rarely been happier birding than I was Saturday, for on that day the two birders who have taught me the most were finally in the same car together. Michael is a British birder who has been living in Shanghai since last year.

The bad weather kept us off Lesser Yangshan Island and dashed our hopes of visiting Hengsha Island. As darkness fell Saturday, we drove Michael to the Dishui Lake Metro Station. Jan-Erik, Elaine, and I spent the night at the Holiday Inn at Nanhui. This proved to be a good move, for staying at Nanhui saved me a 90-km drive back to the city after an exhausting day and put us in position for an early start Sunday. A sea-view room cost 500 yuan, money we considered well-invested.

PHOTOS

FROM THE CRAIGBRELSFORD.COM ARCHIVES: Yellow-rumped Flycatcher, Yangkou, Rudong, Jiangsu, 2 May 2014. Elaine and I noted our seasonal-first Yellow-rumped at Zhongshan Park, Shanghai, on 21 April 2016. An East Asian favorite, Ficedula zanthopygia breeds in China from Heilongjiang south to Jiangsu. The male is beautiful.
FROM THE CRAIGBRELSFORD.COM ARCHIVES: Yellow-rumped Flycatcher, Yangkou, Rudong, Jiangsu, 2 May 2014. Elaine and I noted our seasonal-first Yellow-rumped at Zhongshan Park, Shanghai, on 21 April 2016. An East Asian favorite, Ficedula zanthopygia breeds in China from Heilongjiang south to Jiangsu. The male is beautiful. (Craig Brelsford)
FROM THE CRAIGBRELSFORD.COM ARCHIVES: Tristram's Bunting, Lesser Yangshan Island, 25 April 2013. Emberiza tristrami breeds in forests, and its preference for that sort of habitat is evident even on migration in places such as Shanghai. The species can be numerous in April in heavily forested urban parks such as Century, where we noted 11 individuals on 22 April 2016.
FROM THE CRAIGBRELSFORD.COM ARCHIVES: Tristram’s Bunting, Lesser Yangshan Island, 25 April 2013. Emberiza tristrami breeds in forests, and its preference for that sort of habitat is evident even on migration in places such as Shanghai. The species can be numerous in April in heavily forested urban parks such as Century, where we noted 11 individuals on 22 April 2016. (Craig Brelsford)
FROM THE CRAIGBRELSFORD.COM ARCHIVES: Temminck's Stint, Yangkou, Rudong, Jiangsu, 19 Sept. 2012. Calidris temminckii is a loner and prefers freshwater habitats. It is a passage migrant in the Shanghai region, and there are winter records. We noted 3 on 23 April 2016 at Nanhui, Shanghai.
FROM THE CRAIGBRELSFORD.COM ARCHIVES: Temminck’s Stint, Yangkou, Rudong, Jiangsu, 19 Sept. 2012. Calidris temminckii is a loner and prefers freshwater habitats. It is a passage migrant in the Shanghai region, and there are winter records. We noted 3 on 23 April 2016 at Nanhui, Shanghai. (Craig Brelsford)
Brown-headed Thrush with (in top L panel) Eyebrowed Thrush and Black-faced Bunting. Nanhui, Shanghai, 24 April 2016.
Brown-headed Thrush with (in top L panel) Eyebrowed Thrush and Black-faced Bunting. Nanhui, Shanghai, 24 April 2016. (Craig Brelsford)
Siberian Rubythroat, Nanhui, 24 April 2016.
Siberian Rubythroat, Nanhui, 24 April 2016. (Craig Brelsford)

List 1 of 1 for Sun. 24 April 2016 (79 species)

Birds noted around Pudong Nanhui Dongtan Wetland (Pǔdōng Nánhuì Dōngtān Shīdì [浦东南汇东滩湿地]), Shanghai, China (30.920507, 121.973159). List includes birds found along Shijitang Road from 31.000204, 121.938145 S to 30.851114, 121.848527. Rainy in morning, then cloudy. Low 13° C, high 17° C. Wind ENE 21 km/h. Visibility 10 km. PM2.5 AQI: 139 (unhealthful). Sunrise 05:15, sunset 18:29. SUN 24 APR 2016 05:45-13:10. Craig Brelsford, Elaine Du, & Jan-Erik Nilsén.

Common Pheasant Phasianus colchicus 2
Little Grebe Tachybaptus ruficollis 2
Black-faced Spoonbill Platalea minor 17
Chinese Pond Heron Ardeola bacchus 3
Grey Heron Ardea cinerea 2
Little Egret Egretta garzetta 13
Chinese Egret E. eulophotes 11
Grey Plover Pluvialis squatarola 1
Little Ringed Plover Charadrius dubius 4
Kentish Plover C. alexandrinus 5
Lesser Sand Plover C. mongolus 2
Lesser/Greater Sand Plover C. mongolous/leschenaultii 5
Pin-tailed/Swinhoe’s Snipe Gallinago stenura/megala 1
Common Snipe G. gallinago 15
Asian Dowitcher Limnodromus semipalmatus 1
Whimbrel Numenius phaeopus 10
Far Eastern Curlew N. madagascariensis 2
Common Redshank Tringa totanus 4
Marsh Sandpiper T. stagnatilis 30
Common Greenshank T. nebularia 15
Wood Sandpiper T. glareola 8
Terek Sandpiper Xenus cinereus 3
Common Sandpiper Actitis hypoleucos 3
Great Knot Calidris tenuirostris 1
Red Knot C. canutus 2
Red-necked Stint C. ruficollis 60
Temminck’s Stint C. temminckii 1
Long-toed Stint C. subminuta 4
Sharp-tailed Sandpiper C. acuminata 5
Curlew Sandpiper C. ferruginea 1
Vega Gull Larus vegae vegae/L. v. mongolicus 1
Whiskered Tern Chlidonias hybrida 14
Oriental Turtle Dove Streptopelia orientalis 2
Spotted Dove Spilopelia chinensis 3
Common Kingfisher Alcedo atthis 2
Eurasian Wryneck Jynx torquilla 3
Brown Shrike Lanius cristatus 1
Long-tailed Shrike L. schach 3
Chinese Penduline Tit Remiz consobrinus 5
Oriental Skylark Alauda gulgula 15
Light-vented Bulbul Pycnonotus sinensis 30
Pale/Sand Martin Riparia diluta/riparia 2
Barn Swallow Hirundo rustica ca. 3000
Red-rumped Swallow Cecropis daurica 3
Japanese/Manchurian Bush Warbler Horornis diphone canturians/H. borealis borealis 1 singing
Yellow-browed Warbler Phylloscopus inornatus 2
Arctic/Kamchatka Leaf/Japanese Leaf Warbler P. borealis/examinandus/xanthodryas 1
Pale-legged/Sakhalin Leaf Warbler P. tenellipes/borealoides 2
Eastern Crowned Warbler P. coronatus 2
Oriental Reed Warbler Acrocephalus orientalis 20 singing
Marsh Grassbird Helopsaltes pryeri 3 singing
Plain Prinia Prinia inornata 2
Vinous-throated Parrotbill Sinosuthora webbiana 50
Reed Parrotbill Paradoxornis heudei 2
Crested Myna Acridotheres cristatellus 10
White’s Thrush Zoothera aurea 1
Grey-backed Thrush Turdus hortulorum 8
Japanese Thrush T. cardis 2
Eyebrowed Thrush T. obscurus 1
Pale Thrush T. pallidus 10
Brown-headed Thrush T. chrysolaus 4
Asian Brown Flycatcher Muscicapa latirostris 3
Blue-and-white Flycatcher Cyanoptila cyanomelana 2
Siberian Blue Robin Larvivora cyane 2
Siberian Rubythroat Calliope calliope 3
Mugimaki Flycatcher Ficedula mugimaki 1
Stejneger’s Stonechat Saxicola stejnegeri 4
Eurasian Tree Sparrow Passer montanus 30
Eastern Yellow Wagtail Motacilla tschutschensis 100 (60 tschutschensis, 10 taivana, 1 macronyx)
Grey Wagtail M. cinerea 2
White Wagtail M. alba 5 leucopsis
Richard’s Pipit Anthus richardi 4
Olive-backed Pipit Anthus hodgsoni 5
Pechora Pipit A. gustavi 2
Red-throated Pipit A. cervinus 1
Tristram’s Bunting Emberiza tristrami 3
Chestnut-eared Bunting E. fucata 3
Little Bunting E. pusilla 1
Black-faced Bunting E. spodocephala 40
Pallas’s Reed Bunting E. pallasi 2

Featured image: Asian Dowitcher, Cape Nanhui, Shanghai, 24 April 2016. Listed as near-threatened by the IUCN, Limnodromus semipalmatus breeds in Siberia, Mongolia, and Heilongjiang and occurs on passage in the Shanghai area. (Craig Brelsford)

Chinese Egret & Singing Pale-legged Leaf Warbler on Yangshan

From Thurs. 14 April to Tues. 19 April 2016, Elaine and I combined inner-city birding (Century Park, Shanghai Botanical Garden) with suburban-coastal birding (Nanhui, Lesser Yangshan). We noted 102 species. Sun. 17 April was the big day, with 95 species noted. Among them were 2 Chinese Egret and 3 singing Pale-legged Leaf Warbler on Lesser Yangshan and Rufous-faced Warbler, Swinhoe’s Minivet, and near-threatened Curlew Sandpiper at Nanhui. Among our many firsts-of-season were 10 Narcissus Flycatcher, 4 Eastern Crowned Warbler, 2 members of the Arctic Warbler Complex, and Yellow-browed Bunting. With the spring migration rolling on strong, even the city parks gave us seasonal firsts, with Eurasian Woodcock and Blue-and-white Flycatcher at Century on Thursday and Eyebrowed Thrush Tuesday at the Botanical Garden. During the 6-day period, we noted 0 raptors, whether Accipitriform, Strigiform, or Falconiform.

When silent, as is most often the case in Shanghai even in spring, Pale-legged Leaf Warbler and Sakhalin Leaf Warbler are indistinguishable, and a typical bird list this time of year includes the entry “Pale-legged/Sakhalin Leaf Warbler Phylloscopus tenellipes/borealoides.” The songs of these lookalikes are, however, distinct, and on Sunday in the wooded areas of Garbage Dump Valley on Lesser Yangshan we heard the cricket-like song of P. tenellipes. I made a recording (00:22; 1.7 MB):

On Tuesday, Elaine and I found a silent pair; they were moving along thick branches in the manner of a nuthatch and pumping their tail, but because they were not singing we could not ID them beyond Pale-legged/Sakhalin.

Garbage Dump Valley also yielded Meadow Bunting, Brown-flanked Bush Warbler, and Manchurian/Japanese Bush Warbler, and Temple Mount gave us a single Goldcrest as well as Swinhoe’s/Pin-tailed Snipe.

On Sunday, Blue-and-white Flycatcher were noted in Garbage Dump Valley, on Temple Mount, and at Nanhui and on Thursday at Century. Each male was studied carefully so as not to miss Zappey’s Flycatcher, a recently recognized species that has been recorded in Shanghai (by Swedish birder Jocko Hammar in 2014). This spring, we Shanghai birders will do well to study each Blue-and-white Flycatcher carefully, in particular adult males, lest we miss Zappey’s. In Forktail No. 28, August 2012, Paul Leader and Geoff Carey write: “Males from populations that breed in central China [i.e., Zappey’s] are distinct from other populations in being blue or blue-green across the breast, throat and ear-coverts, and in having black or blackish restricted to the lores. … The upperparts are typically blue-green.” There are various other distinctions, not noted here.

For the first time we noted Marsh Grassbird north of the Magic Parking Lot/Holiday Inn at Nanhui. This new location is on the road leading into the reed bed and lined with street lamps. Another, larger location is 30.866006, 121.939614, a point 2.8 km S of the lock at Nanhui and 4.1 km S of the Magic Parking Lot/Holiday Inn. We discovered Helopsaltes pryeri at the southern location on 10 April and found them there again Sunday. 3 Reed Parrotbill were in the area, and Pallas’s Reed Bunting, so numerous just a few weeks ago, were nearly absent, most of them having departed for breeding areas north.

The Chinese Egret were our reward for never failing to scrutinize groups of Little Egret. Sure enough, our Egretta eulophotes were associating with 3 E. garzetta on a taut anchor line tethering a boat to the bottom of a little bay along Gangchi Road (30.612507, 122.105993). We are not sure whether our view is a one-off or whether something about that bay is attractive to that species.

Little Curlew, Lesser Yangshan Island, 17 April 2016. © 2016 by Stephan Popp & Xueping Popp.
Little Curlew, Lesser Yangshan Island, 17 April 2016. © 2016 by Stephan Popp & Xueping Popp.

At the Accidental (and probably Temporary) Wetland on Lesser Yangshan, we found the 2 Little Curlew, 1 of our 2 Garganey, Purple Heron, Black-tailed Godwit, 1 of our 6 Pacific Swift, 18 of our 80 Sharp-tailed Sandpiper, 2 Red-rumped Swallow, and Oriental Reed Warbler. Accidental Marsh sits on land reclaimed when a causeway was built linking Lesser Yangshan and Dazhitou Island. The coordinates of this spot are 30.611902, 122.114873. Bird this spot while the birding is good!

On Thurs. 14 April, Elaine and I birded Century Park, noting 31 species. 2 Eurasian Woodcock were seen in the forested area near Gate 7 known as “Woodcock Forest” (31.215413, 121.547678). There were impressive flocks of Brambling, 72 in all. Other highlights: Eurasian Hoopoe 1, Pale Thrush 23, White’s Thrush 2, and Chinese Blackbird 40, among them 2 fledglings.

The encounter with the woodcocks occurred just a few meters from the point where Elaine and I found this species last 30 Oct. Woodcock Forest is usually devoid of humans, and forest species tend to pool there. For best results, tiptoe in and scan silently. Do not forget to look into the canopy; I have seen sparrowhawks there.

We found no Yellow-bellied Tit, the only leaf warbler we found was a single Yellow-browed Warbler, and we thought low our count of just 1 Grey-backed Thrush. There were no other flycatchers besides the Blue-and-white.

As I have noted many times before, thieves are active at Century. On Thursday I had the unusual experience of thief-watching. Two folks were sitting on a park bench looking out over the lake. Elaine and I were standing far behind and noticed an ugly man in ratty clothing approach the couple from the forest behind them. He was moving in a catlike manner and was either casing the couple or was about to snatch something. I moved in noisily, and he slunk off.

This thief and others in his gang must be skillful, otherwise they wouldn’t have operated in the park so long. Their booty is phones, wallets, and purses, their victims distracted persons relaxing in the park. To avoid falling prey, keep your phone zipped in your pocket, leave nothing lying around, and use your powers of observation honed through birding to assess the people around you.

On Tues. 19 April, a walk through the Shanghai Botanical Garden netted Elaine and me 28 species. 2 Japanese Tit fledglings were following their parents and making begging calls, 4 Common Sandpiper were in Zhāngjiātáng Hé (张家塘河), and White’s Thrush, Grey-backed Thrush, Pale Thrush, and Eyebrowed Thrush were found in a quiet wooded area (31.147780, 121.438917) along the stream.

Sunday marked the reunion of the five-member Dream Team after a winter hiatus. Husband-wife members Stephan and Xueping Popp took many fine shots, and Stephan once again performed skillfully behind the wheel. Senior Birder Michael Grunwell combined sober experience with boyish enthusiasm, the latter particularly in evidence when he beheld Narcissus Flycatcher, a lifer for him. Elaine Du did her usual fine job keeping the list. Though I’m making a quick recovery from my intercostal muscle strain suffered 10 April, still I traveled light, eschewing photography and using only binoculars.

PHOTOS

Purple Heron, Lesser Yangshan Island, 17 April 2016. © 2016 by Stephan Popp & Xueping Popp.
Purple Heron, Lesser Yangshan Island, 17 April 2016. © 2016 by Stephan Popp & Xueping Popp.
Rufous-faced Warbler, Nanhui, Shanghai, China, 17 April 2016. © 2016 by Stephan Popp & Xueping Popp.
Rufous-faced Warbler, Nanhui, Shanghai, China, 17 April 2016. © 2016 by Stephan Popp & Xueping Popp.

Featured image: Elaine Du (L) and Xueping Popp scan for leaf warblers in Garbage Dump Valley on Lesser Yangshan Island, Zhejiang, China, Sun. 17 April 2016. (Craig Brelsford)

Singing White’s Thrush at Century Park

On Thurs. 7 April 2016, my wife Elaine Du and I noted 30 species at Century Park. For the first time in my life, I heard White’s Thrush sing. Many of the wintering species were still very much present, among them 40 Pale Thrush. Bird Island, the sanctuary within a sanctuary in the middle of the park, once again proved its worth, yielding 1 of our 2 Great Spotted Woodpecker as well as all our 18 Oriental Turtle Dove plus Chinese Pond Heron and Grey Heron. One of our Red-flanked Bluetail was a beautiful blue adult male, and we found migrating Stejneger’s Stonechat. Dusky Thrush, 63 of which we found on our last visit on 15 March, have left the park, and we found no Grey-backed Thrush.

Elaine Du updates the day list in a quiet area of Century Park, 7 April 2016. The recent rains were bringing forth an earthy odor from the forest floor, some of the flowers were fragrant, and in this scrubby area the herbs we trod on were giving off spicy scents.
Elaine Du updates the day list in a quiet area of Century Park, 7 April 2016. The recent rains were bringing forth an earthy odor from the forest floor, some of the flowers were fragrant, and in this scrubby area the herbs we trod on were giving off spicy scents. (Craig Brelsford)

On an overcast, quiet weekday that according to the guards at Gate 7 saw the 140-hectare park attract only 2500 visitors, Elaine and I soaked in the peaceful atmosphere. The recent rains brought forth an earthy odor from the forest floor, some of the wildflowers were fragrant, and the herbs we trod on gave off spicy scents.

So quiet was the park that we actually were able to listen to birdsong for sustained amounts of time. Chinese Blackbird, Light-vented Bulbul, and Azure-winged Magpie, the Big 3 residents of Century, created a river of sound, supplemented by some Chinese Grosbeak.

Amid that flow, and with the low rumble being made by the traffic on Huamu Road, I picked out a sound that was definitely being made by a bird but was unlike any I had heard before. It was a one-note, drawn-out, plaintive whistle, haunting and beautiful, with pauses of several seconds in between. Mesmerized, I walked toward the sound, which was coming from the canopy. The song suddenly stopped, and out flew a White’s Thrush. The whole episode was over in a minute or two, and I had not made a recording. But while the memory of the song was still fresh, I played back recordings of the song of White’s that I have on my iPhone. There was no doubt. The song Elaine and I heard and the song on my phone were the same.

We met a man who recently retired from China Customs and is familiar with Western culture. This smart fellow says he exercises at Century every day and that so-called Bird Island (31.217405, 121.554936) is devoid of special birds. “鸟岛无鸟,” he said. I knew he was wrong, but I let it go, because appreciating Bird Island requires more knowledge of birds than this gentleman was likely interested in acquiring. He could not see that while Spotted Dove, a “city” bird, are numerous throughout the park as well as in the deepest parts of the inner-city jungle, Oriental Turtle Dove, a more “country” bird, rely greatly on Bird Island. In winter, hundreds of White-cheeked Starling and Red-billed Starling roost on trees on and around the island, and I have seen Mandarin Duck on its shores. Great Spotted Woodpecker, rare in Shanghai, are found there regularly. I have not set foot on Bird Island since 2009, but that’s fine with me because it is possible with binoculars to peer into its forest, and in any case I agree with the principle of Bird Island, which is to confine human beings and cats to the mainland side of its protective moat.

The ticket-takers at Gate 7 told us some interesting facts. Last Monday was Qingming, an important national holiday, and with the fine weather that day, Century received 50,000 visitors. On a typical Saturday or Sunday, they told us, 30,000 to 40,000 visitors pack the Pudong park.

Related Link: Have you viewed our recently created page, Birds Recorded at Century Park? There you can view all the species of bird recorded at urban Shanghai’s most birdable park.

Featured image: Shanghai Birding’s Elaine Du searches for Great Spotted Woodpecker on Bird Island, visible across the water. The miniature nature reserve in Century Park remains out of reach of cats (and humans) and teems with birds. (Craig Brelsford)

36 Species at Century Park

Elaine and I noted 36 species, an all-time high for us at Century Park. The list is a delightful, passerine-heavy, and thus very typical Century Park mix, livened up by Eurasian Woodcock. We found Great Spotted Woodpecker, uncommon in the park, and Tristram’s Bunting showed well. Thrush species are arriving, but their numbers are still small. We had 5 White’s Thrush, 6 Grey-backed Thrush, 2 Eyebrowed Thrush, Japanese Thrush, and Pale Thrush as well as the ever-present Chinese Blackbird.

The woodcock was in the very productive forest to the right of Gate 7 from the perspective of one entering the park. The sparrowhawks were seen high above Gate 7; distinguishing between Japanese and Eurasian Sparrowhawk, the two likely species, would have been guesswork for me with birds that high.

Black-browed Reed Warbler were seen once again in the reeds edging the lake near Gate 7. Along the reed bed near the soccer field we found an adult-male Bull-headed Shrike.

Weather: Mostly cloudy. High 19°C.

Century Park (Shìjì Gōngyuán [世纪公园]), Pudong New Area (Pǔdōng Xīn Qū [浦东新区]), Shanghai, China (31.219361, 121.551900). 08:10-12:15.

Little Grebe Tachybaptus ruficollis 8
Black-crowned Night Heron Nycticorax nycticorax 3
Little Egret Egretta garzetta 4
Accipter sp. 2
White-breasted Waterhen Amaurornis phoenicurus 2
Common Moorhen Gallinula chloropus 2
Eurasian Woodcock Scolopax rusticola 1
Spotted Dove Spilopelia chinensis ca. 75
Common Kingfisher Alcedo atthis 4
Great Spotted Woodpecker Dendrocopos major 1
Bull-headed Shrike Lanius bucephalus 1
Long-tailed Shrike L. schach 3
Azure-winged Magpie Cyanopica cyanus ca. 50
Yellow-bellied Tit Pardaliparus venustulus 15
Japanese Tit Parus minor 11
Light-vented Bulbul Pycnonotus sinensis 25
Black-throated Bushtit Aegithalos concinnus 15
Pallas’s Leaf Warbler Phylloscopus proregulus 4
Yellow-browed Warbler P. inornatus 5
Black-browed Reed Warbler Acrocephalus bistrigiceps 2
Vinous-throated Parrotbill Sinosuthora webbiana 45
White’s Thrush Zoothera aurea 5
Grey-backed Thrush Turdus hortulorum 6
Japanese Thrush T. cardis 1
Chinese Blackbird T. mandarinus 40
Eyebrowed Thrush T. obscurus 2
Pale Thrush T. pallidus 1
Red-flanked Bluetail Tarsiger cyanurus 5
Mugimaki Flycatcher Ficedula mugimaki 1
Daurian Redstart Phoenicurus auroreus 4
Eurasian Tree Sparrow Passer montanus 10
White Wagtail Motacilla alba 3
Olive-backed Pipit Anthus hodgsoni 11
Chinese Grosbeak Eophona migratoria 4
Eurasian Siskin Spinus spinus 5
Tristram’s Bunting Emberiza tristrami 2

Featured image: Japanese Thrush Turdus cardis passes through the Shanghai region each spring and autumn. This monotypic species breeds on all the main islands of Japan as well as in a disjunct range from Henan to Guizhou. I took this photo of a male last year on Lesser Yangshan Island.

24 Species at Century Park

A 7 km stroll at Century Park this morning netted 24 species, with 3 Japanese Grosbeak leading the list. 2 Black-browed Reed Warbler were in the reedy fringe of the pond near Gate 7. Winter visitors Dusky Thrush and Yellow-bellied Tit were present. Black-faced Bunting was the sole representative of Emberiza.

The Japanese Grosbeak that we saw most clearly was an adult. It was readily separable from Chinese Grosbeak by its larger size, simpler wing coloration (black primaries with large white patch in middle), and less-extensive black cap.

Elaine and I closely watched Black-browed Reed Warbler Acrocephalus bistrigiceps. Both birds were making their characteristic harsh churr; one was warbling softly. Watching the reed warblers was not only enjoyable, but also necessary to eliminate the similar Speckled Reed Warbler A. sorghophilus, a bird I have yet to tick. Birders will do well to scrutinize A. bistrigiceps, a common species usually found in the same reedy habitats as A. sorghophilus, an endangered and poorly known species that with luck just might be discoverable in the Shanghai area.

I’m thinking buntings are a bit late this year; could warmer weather be causing them to move more leisurely southward?

Weather: The unseasonably warm weather continues. High 26°C.

Century Park (Shìjì Gōngyuán [世纪公园]), Pudong New Area (Pǔdōng Xīn Qū [浦东新区]), Shanghai, China (31.219361, 121.551900). 07:40-10:45.

Little Grebe Tachybaptus ruficollis 3
Little Egret Egretta garzetta 1
Black-crowned Night Heron Nycticorax nycticorax 3
White-breasted Waterhen Amaurornis phoenicurus 2
Common Moorhen Gallinula chloropus 6
Feral Pigeon (Rock Dove) Columba livia 1
Spotted Dove Spilopelia chinensis 5
Common Kingfisher Alcedo atthis 1
Long-tailed Shrike Lanius schach 2
Azure-winged Magpie Cyanopica cyanus ca. 50
Yellow-bellied Tit Pardaliparus venustulus 8
Japanese Tit Parus minor 5
Light-vented Bulbul Pycnonotus sinensis 35
Yellow-browed Warbler Phylloscopus inornatus 6
Black Browed Reed Warbler Acrocephalus bistrigiceps 2
Red-billed Starling Spodiopsar sericeus 4
Chinese Blackbird Turdus mandarinus 25
Dusky Thrush T. eunomus 5
Red-flanked Bluetail Tarsiger cyanurus 1
Eurasian Tree Sparrow Passer montanus 4
White Wagtail Motacilla alba 1 leucopsis
Japanese Grosbeak Eophona personata 2
Chinese Grosbeak E. migratoria 4
Black-faced Bunting Emberiza spodocephala 1

Featured image: Japanese Grosbeak, Lesser Yangshan Island, 17 Oct. 2015. In Shanghai, Eophona personata, a passage migrant, is much less commonly seen than Chinese Grosbeak E. migratoria, which breeds in parks in the city. The two species are readily separable by the larger size of E. personata as well as its simpler wing coloration (all-black primaries with large white patch in middle), less extensive black cap, and lack of black tip to bill.