Rare Breeding Record of Great Grey Owl in China

Last July, Elaine and I spent two weeks covering the vast Hulunbeier region of Inner Mongolia with Beijing-based Swedish birder Jan-Erik Nilsén. On our very first day (11 July 2015), we had a rare breeding record of Great Grey Owl. We found the owls at 49.501528, 121.364934. The story below comes from Elaine’s and my report, Inner Mongolia & Heilongjiang, 2015:

“As we were driving, we saw, far in the distance atop a billboard, a Great Grey Owl. As I stepped out of the car to admire it, a car came from the opposite direction and scared it away. We sighed, drove to the billboard, and parked. Would the owl come back? No. But something interesting occurred. From somewhere in the forest came begging calls, which I recorded (00:08; 1.1 MB):

“Those are clearly the begging calls of a juvenile Great Grey Owl. A breeding record! That is good news, though not wholly unexpected. Though ‘very rare in China’ (MacKinnon), Strix nebulosa lapponica has one stronghold in this country, and that is the Greater Khingan Range of Hulunbeier–a fact known to the birders who find the species here each year (usually in winter). What’s more, next to us was ideal Great Grey Owl habitat, being ‘dense boreal or coniferous forest … with openings,’ as Handbook of the Birds of the World describes it–again, no surprise, as the forest next to which we were standing is known to hold Great Grey Owl and other owls. Why, then, is a breeding record important? A breeding record matters because it confirms that at least some of the Great Grey Owl in the region are not simply wandering to Hulunbeier in the winter but are using the area year-round.”

Why am I posting this news now? For months, the recording of the begging calls lay in my computer, inert. Recently, reviewing the events of July 2015, I happened upon the recording. I remember Jan-Erik mentioning, way back in July, that we may have a breeding record of Strix nebulosa. But we got busy and never followed up, and so only now can we report this interesting record.

The report from which this post was derived, Inner Mongolia & Heilongjiang, 2015, is just one of many richly illustrated, useful reports on the shanghaibirding.com Explorations page. Plan your big China trip, learn about birding, or just sit back and enjoy our accounts of our birding expeditions in China. We are adding more and more of my sound recordings to the reports for a true multimedia experience. You’ll love Explorations!

Featured image: L-R: Craig Brelsford, Elaine Du, and Jan-Erik Nilsén, on the S301 between Genhe and Labudalin, Hulunbeier, Inner Mongolia, China, 19 July 2015.

Dulong Gorge, Yunnan: The First Week

Editor’s note: For “Dulong Gorge, Yunnan: Part 2,” the second in this two-part series on birding Dulong Gorge, please click here.

A week in Yunnan is under our belt, and Dulong Gorge is yielding amazing Himalayan specialties. Among the species noted by us so far are Fire-tailed Myzornis, Grandala, Rufous-breasted Bush Robin, Striated Laughingthrush, and Assam Laughingthrush as well as Gongshan Muntjac. We have noted western Yunnan favorites Rusty-flanked Treecreeper, Yellow-throated Fulvetta, Beautiful Sibia, Rusty-fronted Barwing, and Streak-throated Barwing. We have heard the mournful whistle of Hill Partridge, found a flock of 140 Tibetan Serin, noted Goldcrest in a mixed flock at 2960 m, and discovered 4 Eurasian Teal looking out of place on the Dulong River. Also using the river are Common Merganser, Great Cormorant, Crested Kingfisher, and Brown Dipper. Crimson-breasted Woodpecker was a lifer for us, and Wallcreeper delighted us all. We noted a troop of Stump-tailed Macaque.

Fire-tailed Myzornis, Dulong River Gorge, Yunnan, 20 Feb. 2016.
Fire-tailed Myzornis, Dulong River Gorge, Yunnan, 20 Feb. 2016. (Craig Brelsford)

HOW WE GOT TO DULONG GORGE

To reach this remote valley, on Tues. 16 Feb. Elaine, our partner Brian Ivon Jones, and I drove non-stop from Kunming Changshui International Airport to Gongshan, a grueling twelve-and-a-half hour, 814-km ride. Brian, an Englishman living in Shenzhen, is the person who first gave me the idea of visiting the Dulong Gorge; this is my fourth birding trip with him. From Kunming we took the G56 to the G320 and S228 north of Baoshan. We drove the narrow S228 at night because we guessed that traffic in the dozens of towns along the Salween River would be less. We were right. At 03:15 Wednesday we arrived exhausted but in good spirits at Gongshan.

On Wednesday morning 17 Feb., we stocked up on food and fuel at Gongshan. We filled the tank of our rented Mitsubishi Pajero and, after applying for a permit with the local government, filled a 30-liter tank with gasoline. The 30-liter tank would be our extra source of fuel, for there are no gas stations in the Dulong Gorge.

Our rented Mitsubishi Pajero near grocery store in Gongshan, Yunnan, 17 Feb. 2016. We rented this brand-new vehicle at Kunming Changshui International Airport through the rental-car company Héxié Zūchē (和谐租车). It was the perfect car for our trip.
Our rented Mitsubishi Pajero near grocery store in Gongshan, Yunnan, 17 Feb. 2016. We rented this brand-new vehicle at Kunming Changshui International Airport through the rental-car company Héxié Zūchē (和谐租车). It was the perfect car for our trip. (Craig Brelsford)

We birded the Gongshan-Dulong Road 87 km to Kongdang. On the Gongshan side, still in the Salween basin, we noted our first of many Ashy-throated Warbler, Yellow-browed Tit, Whiskered Yuhina, Stripe-throated Yuhina, Fire-breasted Flowerpecker, and Green-tailed Sunbird. A bird wave at elev. 1980 m gave us views of less-common birds such as Black-eared Shrike-babbler, Grey Crested Tit, and Blyth’s Leaf Warbler. At a scenic overlook at 2450 m, we found a stunning male Blue-fronted Redstart. At about 2600 m, we began to notice snow on the ground. At 2960 m, near the eastern terminus of the Dulongjiang Tunnel, with snow lying deep all around us, a bird wave passed. It contained Coal Tit as well as our first Rusty-flanked Treecreeper and Goldcrest.

Eastern terminus of new Dulongjiang Tunnel above Dulong River Gorge, Yunnan. Elev. 2960 m. 17 Feb. 2016.
Eastern terminus of new Dulongjiang Tunnel above Dulong River Gorge, Yunnan. Elev. 2960 m. 17 Feb. 2016. (Craig Brelsford)

On the other side of the tunnel, at elev. 2260 m, we noted Darjeeling Woodpecker and Beautiful Sibia at a stretch of road I call “Sibia Lane.” I never fail to find Beautiful Sibia there. At the bridge below we found Yellow-browed Tit and a flock of Black-faced Warbler.

In Kongdang, the administrative center of the Dulong Gorge, I found a town much different from the one I met during my first trip here in June 2014. Bridges are being built, a row of new hotels and restaurants has arisen, and a gas station is under construction. Despite the progress, this valley still feels like a land that time forgot. Some Dulong people keep the tradition of animal sacrifice, and we have seen two old women with tattooed faces.

DULONG GORGE FROM END TO END

Crimson-breasted Woodpecker Dendrocopos cathpharius, Dulong River Gorge, 18 Feb. 2016.
Crimson-breasted Woodpecker Dryobates cathpharius, Dulong River Gorge, 18 Feb. 2016. (Craig Brelsford)

We spent Thursday, Friday, and Saturday exploring the areas south, north, and east of Kongdang. On Thurs. 18 Feb. we drove to Qinlangdang, the village at the southern terminus of the Dulong Gorge road and the last stop before the China-Burma border. We noted 45 species and covered elevations ranging from 1220 m at Qinlangdang to 1570 m along the cliffs north of that village. Great Cormorant and Crested Kingfisher were a surprise. An impressive bird wave just south of town netted us many trip firsts, among them Crimson-breasted Woodpecker, Rufous-bellied Niltava, and Silver-eared Mesia. At stops along the road we found Rufous-breasted Bush Robin, a lifer for all of us, as well as Golden-throated Barbet, Black-faced Laughingthrush, Rusty-fronted Barwing, and Alpine Accentor.

On Fri. 19 Feb. we headed north. We easily found Wallcreeper, and in the heavily forested opposite bank of the river we heard the harsh cries of Striated Laughingthrush. As we drove, we scanned the river carefully, particularly the calm spots. At one such spot we found 4 Eurasian Teal. They were not feeding and must have been using the gorge as a conduit to more suitable waters. South of Xiongdang, conifers and other alpine flora begin to predominate, and the landscape looks profoundly different from the lusher, warmer areas around Qinlangdang. We found a scree slope far above us and, using my spotting scope, I pulled in a flock of 8 Grandala.

Brian Ivon Jones (L) and Elaine Du viewing Grandala for the first time, Dulong Gorge, 19 Feb. 2016.
Brian Ivon Jones (L) and Elaine Du viewing Grandala for the first time, Dulong Gorge, 19 Feb. 2016. (Craig Brelsford)

Dizhengdang occupies one of the broadest areas we have seen in the Dulong Valley and is an excellent place for birding. At the fringes of the farmland are scrubby areas that hold many species and will surely hold more come spring, and there is a collection of abandoned farmhouses and adjacent gardens that will be nicely overgrown a few months from now. We finally were able to leave the car here and walk around. We picked up many trip firsts, among them Himalayan Buzzard, Snow Pigeon, Grey-backed Shrike, Black-browed Bushtit, and White-throated Redstart. We drove north to the village of Xiongdang. We drove past the church in Xiongdang on a dirt road that is soon to be a paved highway to Tibet. We stopped 3 km north of the village. As it was late afternoon and because the road was getting rougher, we decided to turn back. We noted Common Merganser and Brown Dipper, and as we approached Xiongdang again we encountered another Wallcreeper.

Eurasian Teal in Dulong River, 19 Feb. 2016.
Eurasian Teal in Dulong River, 19 Feb. 2016. (Craig Brelsford)

Sat. 20 Feb. saw us head back up the Gongshan-Dulong Road. We birded an elevation range of 1350 m, from 1490 m in Kongdang to 2840 m at the snowy western terminus of the Dulongjiang Tunnel. Elaine saw a bird that had to be either Ward’s or Red-headed Trogon, and we heard the cries of Hill Partridge on the ridges above us. At Sibia Lane, elev. 2260 m, Elaine cried out, “Myzornis!” Brian and I came running and found a pair of this quintessential Himalayan bird. A pair gave us clear views before retiring into the undergrowth, and we found another pair nearby. The beautiful, emerald-green cross between parrotbill and babbler was a lifer for Elaine and Brian. I had seen the species in 2014. I said to my fellows, “Before this expedition, it was My-zornis. Now it’s Your-zornis, too!”

Striated Laughingthrush and Assam Laughingthrush were hard-won ticks. A flock of 4 of the former appeared screaming above us on the Gongshan-Dulong Road. The fig tree on which they were feeding was directly above us, 25 m high. I leaned back and took record shots, set down my camera, and recorded the harsh cries before a car came and forced me to pause. Later, examining the photos and listening carefully to my recording, we were able to get the ID. Here is the recording I made of Striated Laughingthrush (00:08; 1.1 MB):

The Assam was almost as tricky. Walking along the road, I scared off a single laughingthrush. As Black-faced Laughingthrush has been the most commonly seen laugher so far, I played back a recording of that species to see whether I would get a response. The Assam called back from cover. It was obviously not a Black-faced, but what was it? The bird alighted very briefly on a backlit branch, a silhouette against the sky; this allowed me to determine its size and nothing more. But I had recorded the call, and comparisons to Assam recordings I have downloaded from xeno-canto.org allowed me to make the ID. Here is my recording of the brief call (00:03; 905 KB):

On Sun. 21 Feb. it rained all day and we did no birding. In Kongdang electricity was out for most of the day, and even the cell-phone signal died. We took advantage of the down time to sleep.

Gongshan Muntjac, Gongshan-Dulong Road, elev. 2300 m. 22 Feb. 2016.
Gongshan Muntjac, Gongshan-Dulong Road, elev. 2300 m. 22 Feb. 2016. (Craig Brelsford)

Mon. 22 Feb. saw us redo our route to the Dulongjiang Tunnel and back. The big find of the day was not a bird at all but the mysterious Gongshan Muntjac. We were at the large clearing at 2300 m on the Gongshan-Dulong Road. I had just recorded a lively pair of Bay Woodpecker and was walking back toward the car and Brian. My partner was looking at a dark spot below us on the road. Brian and I aimed to shoot, and I found to my horror that the ultra-high humidity of the gorge had compromised the focusing mechanism on my lens. I had to focus manually, and by that time the muntjac had turned its back to us. Brian captured the earlier moment when the deer was still facing us; I could only get photos of it looking away. The diminutive, rare deer scurried under the guardrail to cover. We walked downhill to the point where it had stood. Above us, we heard a sound like a man imitating a dog barking. Muntjacs are also known as “barking deer”; now we knew why. We believe we photographed a doe and that the buck was barking from cover. So little is known about Muntiacus gongshanensis that IUCN lists it not as endangered or near threatened but as “data deficient.” Almost all photos taken of the species have been done by camera traps. We have photos of an animal that we saw. I also recorded the barking (00:19; 1.6 MB):

The other mammalian highlight was Stump-tailed Macaque. Walking along the road, I noticed rustling in the bamboo far down slope. At first I thought I had startled a herd of small deer. I got this impression because the animals were on the ground and were on all fours. I was able to determine that the animals were macaques. I noted a bare face and nub of a tail. We estimate the troop contained about 10 individuals.

Alpine/"Yunnan" Thrush, Gongshan-Dulong Road, 22 Feb. 2016.
Alpine/’Yunnan’ Thrush, Gongshan-Dulong Road, 22 Feb. 2016. (Craig Brelsford)

Amid these glories, the birding was not bad at all! We added these species to the trip list: Rufous-bellied Woodpecker, Bar-throated Minla, Golden-breasted Fulvetta, White-browed Fulvetta, Himalayan Bluetail, Rufous-breasted Accentor, and the recently re-described Alpine/“Yunnan” Thrush. Elaine, who is familiar with the Zoothera thrushes because of my keen interest in this genus, radioed me: “Himalayan Thrush!” I ran back and just managed to capture record shots. The bird I photographed has the dark ear coverts, yellow base of lower mandible, and yellow legs that distinguish Alpine/“Yunnan” Thrush from Himalayan Thrush. Thank you for alerting me, Elaine!

Rufous-breasted Bush Robin, Dulong Gorge, 18 Feb. 2016. This photo records the moment I first laid eyes on this beautiful Himalayan species.
Rufous-breasted Bush Robin, Dulong Gorge, 18 Feb. 2016. This photo records the moment I first laid eyes on this beautiful Himalayan species. (Craig Brelsford)

Other big news: 290 Grandala in two flocks, an impressive 168 Tibetan Serin, a Fire-tailed Myzornis whose loud calls caused us to stop the car to look, and yet more welcome encounters with Rusty-flanked Treecreeper and Rufous-breasted Bush Robin.

PRACTICALITIES

In Kongdang we checked into Dúlóng Jiāng Dàjiǔdiàn (独龙江大酒店; +86 886-3066888, +86 139-8868-5660, 168 yuan/night). The hotel is new and clean. Electric power is intermittent throughout the village, and because of the uncertain electricity it is prohibited to run the air-conditioning unit; our room was usually chilly as a result. Hot water is not guaranteed. In 2014 I stayed in Dàpíng Bīnguǎn (大平宾馆; +86 139-8869-6984 100 yuan); it’s still there, but we decided to stay at Dúlóng Jiāng Dàjiǔdiàn because it is newer.

We flew into Kunming rather than Baoshan or Dali because of the wider selection of rental cars. We worked with the rental-car company Héxié Zūchē (和谐租车; +86 871-67085834, www.zuche01.com). Héxié rented us a brand-new, four-wheel drive Mitsubishi Pajero, the perfect car for our trip.

PHOTOS

Fire-breasted Flowerpecker above Gongshan, 17 Feb. 2016.
Fire-breasted Flowerpecker above Gongshan, 17 Feb. 2016. (Craig Brelsford)
Wallcreeper, Dulong Gorge, 19 Feb. 2016.
Wallcreeper, Dulong Gorge, 19 Feb. 2016. (Craig Brelsford)

Featured image: Grandala roosting in tree along Gongshan-Dulong Road, Dulong Gorge, Yunnan, 22 Feb. 2016.

Covering Shanghai Birding As It Has Never Been Covered Before

110,000 words. Months of research. Weeks in the field.

The result: Shanghai birding as it has never been covered before.

Our Reports page is up. It is an index to the book-length reports that Elaine Du and I have been writing about birding in Earth’s largest city.

The latest report, just completed, is called Shanghai-area Autumn & Winter Birding, 2015-16. It covers the birding season from 11 Sept. 2015 through last week. This 40,000-word report lists the 268 bird species we noted and has heretofore unpublished photos and sound recordings. To our knowledge, never in a single document has birding in Shanghai been covered so thoroughly.

The latest report joins Shanghai-area Springtime Birding, 2015 (31,000 words, 243 species) and Shanghai-area Autumn & Winter Birding, 2014-15 (39,000 words, 216 species). The reports contain highlights, two versions of our species list, our itineraries, GPS coordinates of birding sites, recommended hotels, interesting anecdotes, lamentations on the state of the Chinese coast, and paeans to the amazing birds we witness.

Are you planning a trip to Shanghai and curious about the birds you could find at that time of year? The blog will give you current news, and Reports will show you what has been found in previous years. Do you live in Shanghai and want to know what birding is like throughout the year? Start your research on our blog; dig deeper with Reports.

In the coming weeks, Elaine and I will start the spring 2016 report.

Featured image: Craig Brelsford puts the finishing touches on Shanghai-area Autumn & Winter Birding, 2015-16, one of three reports featured on the new Reports page on shanghaibirding.com. Photo by Elaine Du.

Come Walk with Us at Nanhui

On Fri. 5 Feb. and Mon. 8 Feb., Elaine Du, Kai Pflug, and I noted 64 species on a two-day “Nanhui on Foot” tour. Horned Grebe, Black-necked Grebe, and Greater Scaup maintained their presence on Dishui Lake, and on Friday we picked out a single Black-faced Spoonbill among the Eurasian Spoonbill. On Monday we noted Water/Brown-cheeked Rail, saw a flock of 240 Kentish Plover and 900 Dunlin, and enjoyed an early morning moment with four bunting species (mainly Pallas’s Reed Bunting and Little Bunting with cameos by Chestnut-eared Bunting and Black-faced Bunting). We struggled to ID our Pallas’s Reed Bunting to ssp. level. Were the mysterious lydiae mixed in?

The interval of 72 hours between Friday and Monday saw changes to the composition of birds on Dishui Lake. Counts of Falcated Duck went from 230 on Friday to 0 on Monday. Horned Grebe and Greater Scaup also fell off our Monday list. Numbers of Tufted Duck, meanwhile, increased from 22 to 140. Common Pochard saw a jump from 0 on Friday to 300 on Monday, but they were found on the pond behind the Magic Parking Lot, which we were unable to check Friday.

Kai Pflug (L) and Elaine Du finishing up a successful birding day at Nanhui, 5 Feb. 2016. With Kai capably handling the photographic side, my skills in that field were rendered irrelevant; I put on my birdwatcher's hat and was content. My wife, as is her wont, kept records and did much scanning with the spotting scope.
Kai Pflug (L) and Elaine Du finishing up a successful birding day at Nanhui, 5 Feb. 2016. With Kai capably handling the photographic side, my skills in that field were rendered irrelevant; I put on my birdwatcher’s hat and was content. My wife, as is her wont, kept records and did much scanning with the spotting scope. (Craig Brelsford)

For maximum efficiency, we distributed duties among our trio. Elaine kept records and scanned the ponds with our Swarovski ATX-95 spotting scope. Kai handled photography, lovingly wielding his Nikon D810 and 400 mm F2.8 lens with 2x teleconverter. I served as chief ornithologist and scope-bearer. We walked 19 km each day.

Hen Harrier (L) and Pied Harrier, Nanhui, Monday. Both are adult females. A conspicuous white rump is a feature of both Circus cyaneus and C. melanoleucos. Note however the more evenly banded tail of the former and the more contrasting upperparts of the latter. Both by Kai Pflug.
Hen Harrier (L) and Pied Harrier, Nanhui, Monday. Both are adult females. A conspicuous white rump is a feature of both Circus cyaneus and C. melanoleucos. Note however the more evenly banded tail of the former and the more contrasting upperparts of the latter. (Kai Pflug)

From Puxi we took Metro Line 2 to Longyang Road, where we transferred to Line 16. We exited Line 16 at Dishui Lake station and took a taxi to Microforest 2 (30.926051, 121.970781), where we began birding. On Friday, we walked all the way back to the Dishui Lake station, and on Monday, we took the bus to Dishui Lake station from the stop behind the Magic Parking Lot.

Reed Parrotbill were noted both days around Microforest 2. We had Naumann’s Thrush on Friday. As was the case last year, Eastern Yellow Wagtail (tschutschensis and taivana) have been present in Shanghai in small numbers throughout the winter.

Horned Grebe has had a sustained presence on Dishui Lake for at least the past 60 days. Also known as Slavonian Grebe, Podiceps auritus is thought to be a rare winter visitor to our area, but it may be overlooked.

Horned Grebe, 1 of 3 seen on Dishui Lake, Shanghai, 5 Feb. 2016. Small numbers of this species have been noted on Dishui Lake since December 2015. Also known as Slavonian Grebe, Podiceps auritus is a rare winter visitor to the Shanghai region. Photo by Kai Pflug for shanghaibirding.com.
Horned Grebe, 1 of 3 seen on Dishui Lake, Shanghai, 5 Feb. 2016. Small numbers of this species have been noted on Dishui Lake since December 2015. Also known as Slavonian Grebe, Podiceps auritus is a rare winter visitor to the Shanghai region. (Kai Pflug)

List 1 of 1 for Fri. 5 Feb. 2016 (49 species). Around Pudong Nanhui Dongtan Wetland (Pǔdōng Nánhuì Dōngtān Shīdì [浦东南汇东滩湿地]), Shanghai, China (30.920507, 121.973159). List includes birds found at Dishui Lake (30.908702, 121.945124) and along Shijitang Road. Mostly sunny, hazy; low -2°C, high 9°C. Visibility 10 km. Wind NNW 15 km/h. PM2.5 AQI: 184. Sunrise 06:44, sunset 17:33. FRI 05 FEB 2016 08:15-15:30. Craig Brelsford, Elaine Du, & Kai Pflug.

Tundra Bean Goose Anser serrirostris 1
Falcated Duck Anas falcata 230
Eurasian Wigeon A. penelope 185
Eastern Spot-billed Duck A. zonorhyncha 36
Northern Shoveler A. clypeata 20
Tufted Duck Aythya fuligula 22
Greater Scaup A. marila 2
Common Pheasant Phasianus colchicus 4
Little Grebe Tachybaptus ruficollis 40
Great Crested Grebe Podiceps cristatus 35
Horned Grebe P. auritus 3
Black-necked Grebe P. nigricollis 2
Eurasian Spoonbill Platalea leucorodia 143
Black-faced Spoonbill P. minor 1
Eurasian Bittern Botaurus stellaris 1
Black-crowned Night Heron Nycticorax nycticorax 5
Grey Heron Ardea cinerea 70
Great Egret A. alba 40
Little Egret Egretta garzetta 90
Great Cormorant Phalacrocorax carbo ca. 600
Western Osprey Pandion haliaetus 1
Eurasian Coot Fulica atra 320
Common Snipe Gallinago gallinago 29
Common Greenshank Tringa nebularia 18
Dunlin Calidris alpina 60 (flock)
Black-headed Gull Chroicocephalus ridibundus 1
Vega Gull Larus vegae vegae or L. v. mongolicus 15
Feral Pigeon (Rock Dove) Columba livia 8
Spotted Dove Spilopelia chinensis 5
Eurasian Hoopoe Upupa epops 1
Long-tailed Shrike Lanius schach 8
Chinese Penduline Tit Remiz consobrinus ca. 50
Eurasian Skylark Alauda arvensis 9
Light-vented Bulbul Pycnonotus sinensis 2
Plain Prinia Prinia inornata 2
Vinous-throated Parrotbill Sinosuthora webbiana 30
Reed Parrotbill Paradoxornis heudei 9
Pale Thrush Turdus pallidus 6
Naumann’s Thrush T. naumanni 1
Dusky Thrush T. eunomus 5
Daurian Redstart Phoenicurus auroreus 3
Eurasian Tree Sparrow Passer montanus ca. 100
Eastern Yellow Wagtail Motacilla tschutschensis 10 (8 taivana, 2 tschutschensis)
White Wagtail M. alba 16 (14 leucopsis, 2 lugens/ocularis)
Richard’s Pipit Anthus richardi 15
Buff-bellied Pipit A. rubescens japonicus 30
Little Bunting Emberiza pusilla 2
Black-faced Bunting E. spodocephala 4
Pallas’s Reed Bunting E. pallasi ca. 60

With the polluted Shanghai air acting as a filter, the morning sunlight kisses this Little Bunting ever so softly, helping photographer Kai Pflug achieve this masterful image.
With the polluted Shanghai air acting as a filter, the morning sunlight kisses this Little Bunting ever so softly, helping photographer Kai Pflug achieve this masterful image. (Kai Pflug)

List 1 of 1 for Mon. 8 Feb. 2016 (56 species). Around Pudong Nanhui Dongtan Wetland (Pǔdōng Nánhuì Dōngtān Shīdì [浦东南汇东滩湿地]), Shanghai, China (30.920507, 121.973159). List includes birds found at Dishui Lake (30.908702, 121.945124) and along Shijitang Road from Microforest 2 to Magic Parking Lot (30.882784, 121.972782). Sunny; low 2°C, high 14°C. Visibility 10 km. Wind NNW 15 km/h. PM2.5 AQI: 171. Sunrise 06:41, sunset 17:36. MON 08 FEB 2016 08:00-16:00. Craig Brelsford, Elaine Du, & Kai Pflug.

goose sp. 2
Eurasian Wigeon Anas penelope 45
Mallard A. platyrhynchos 1
Eastern Spot-billed Duck A. zonorhyncha 130
Northern Shoveler A. clypeata 2
Common Pochard Aythya ferina 300
Tufted Duck A. fuligula 140
Common Pheasant Phasianus colchicus 3
Little Grebe Tachybaptus ruficollis 25
Great Crested Grebe Podiceps cristatus 60
Black-necked Grebe P. nigricollis 2
Eurasian Spoonbill Platalea leucorodia 148
Eurasian Bittern Botaurus stellaris 2
Black-crowned Night Heron Nycticorax nycticorax 30
Grey Heron Ardea cinerea 40
Great Egret A. alba 35
Little Egret Egretta garzetta 25
Great Cormorant Phalacrocorax carbo ca. 550
Western Osprey Pandion haliaetus 1
Hen Harrier Circus cyaneus 1
Pied Harrier C. melanoleucos 1
Brown-cheeked/Water Rail Rallus indicus/R. aquaticus 4
Common Moorhen Gallinula chloropus 2
Eurasian Coot Fulica atra 450
Kentish Plover Charadrius alexandrinus 240
Common Snipe Gallinago gallinago 13
Common Greenshank Tringa nebularia 34
Common Sandpiper Actitis hypoleucos 1
Dunlin Calidris alpina ca. 900 (flock)
Vega Gull Larus vegae vegae or L. v. mongolicus 26
Feral Pigeon (Rock Dove) Columba livia 3
Spotted Dove Spilopelia chinensis 1
Common Kestrel Falco tinnunculus 1
Long-tailed Shrike Lanius schach 12
Eurasian Magpie Pica pica 2
Chinese Penduline Tit Remiz consobrinus 10
Eurasian Skylark Alauda arvensis 3
Light-vented Bulbul Pycnonotus sinensis 3
Zitting Cisticola Cisticola juncidis 1
Vinous-throated Parrotbill Sinosuthora webbiana 45
Reed Parrotbill Paradoxornis heudei 6
Crested Myna Acridotheres cristatellus 3
Pale Thrush Turdus pallidus 3
Dusky Thrush T. eunomus 1
Red-flanked Bluetail Tarsiger cyanurus 2
Daurian Redstart Phoenicurus auroreus 3
Eurasian Tree Sparrow Passer montanus ca. 50
Eastern Yellow Wagtail Motacilla tschutschensis 5 (4 taivana, 1 tschutschensis)
White Wagtail M. alba 22 (20 leucopsis, 2 lugens/ocularis)
Richard’s Pipit Anthus richardi 3
Buff-bellied Pipit A. rubescens japonicus 26
Chestnut-eared Bunting Emberiza fucata 2
Little Bunting E. pusilla 27
Yellow-throated Bunting E. elegans 1
Black-faced Bunting E. spodocephala 2
Pallas’s Reed Bunting E. pallasi ca. 60

Featured image: Pallas’s Reed Bunting Emberiza pallasi, Microforest 2, Nanhui, 8 Feb. 2016. Photo by Kai Pflug for shanghaibirding.com. The thinness of the upper mandible of this specimen raises the question: Could this be E. p. lydiae?

A Bit of Lapland in Shanghai

On 30-31 Jan., Elaine and I noted 75 species at Nanhui, Hengsha, and Chongming. We had 6 Lapland Longspur on Chongming and 50 Mew Gull at Nanhui. The pair of Cinereous Vulture remain on Chongming, and we saw a good portion (65) of the Hooded Crane wintering on the great alluvial island. Red-throated Loon was still at Nanhui, and Dishui Lake once again held Greater Scaup (8), Common Goldeneye, and Horned Grebe (3). We had an impressive 350 Northern Pintail in the sea off Nanhui, and though numbers of Gadwall (590) and Falcated Duck (720) were lower than in November, the species maintain a sizable presence on Hengsha.

Lapland Longspur, Chongming, Shanghai, 31 Jan. 2016.
Lapland Longspur, Chongming, Shanghai, 31 Jan. 2016.

The longspurs appeared late Sunday, just as snow was starting to fall. The inclement weather must have upset the Buff-bellied Pipit, Eurasian Skylark, and Eurasian Tree Sparrow using the recently plowed fields. Suddenly birds were flying everywhere. The grey sky made visual ID difficult, but some of the birds were calling and identifiable by call. But not all; so I took a flurry of record shots. In one series of images was a bird I had never seen before. I sent some of the images to Jan-Erik Nilsén, who told me that the facial pattern was typical of Lapland Longspur. And so it was. MacKinnon says Calcarius lapponicus “winters in small numbers along bare meadows along E coast between 30° and 40° N and along Changjiang River”; that is a box into which our situation neatly fits.

This 3-species-in-1 image shows 2 Kamchatka Gull (bottom L, top R), Vega Gull (large gull in middle), and Black-headed Gull (bottom R). Note the 'kinder' look of Larus canus kamtschatschensis; its more rounded head, in contrast to the more gently sloping forehead of the Vega; and its smaller size in comparison to Vega. Nanhui, 30 Jan. 2016.
This 3-species-in-1 image shows 2 Kamchatka Gull (bottom L, top R), Vega Gull (large gull in middle), and Black-headed Gull (bottom R). Note the ‘kinder’ look of Larus canus kamtschatschensis; its more rounded head, in contrast to the more gently sloping forehead of the Vega; and its smaller size in comparison to Vega. Nanhui, 30 Jan. 2016.

The views of Mew Gull Larus canus came about because of preparation and luck. Ever since Michael Grunwell moved to Shanghai last year, he has been telling me to look for Mew Gull in Shanghai; he was sure it would show up here in winter. Bolstering that suspicion was a recent report from Jonathan Martinez of Mew Gull in Guangdong.

Kamchatka Gull Larus canus kamtschatschensis, Nanhui, 30 Jan. 2016. L. c. kamtschatschensis is larger and darker than the western forms L. c. canus and L. c. heinei. L. c. heinei is known to occur on the China coast and should be looked out for.
Kamchatka Gull Larus canus kamtschatschensis, Nanhui, 30 Jan. 2016. L. c. kamtschatschensis is larger and darker than the western forms L. c. canus and L. c. heinei. L. c. heinei is known to occur on the China coast and should be looked out for.

At Nanhui, gulls usually appear here and there. On Saturday, Elaine and I finally had a chance to view a large group. An afternoon tide was coming in just right, boxing about 300 gulls into a corner of the sea wall. Elaine and I were waiting with camera and spotting scope. “This is the day!” I said. Sure enough, among the dozens of Vega Gull and Black-headed Gull was a sizable element of Mew. We quickly distinguished them from the much larger Vega. The Mew we photographed seem to have a squarer head and beadier eye than would be the case with race heinei; we therefore believe our gulls are Kamchatka Gull Larus canus kamtschatschensis.

The Red-throated Loon was in the large pond behind the Holiday Inn and Magic Parking Lot. Elaine found it doing the scan. Six days earlier, we had 3 Red-throated Loon in a pond a few kilometers north. Around 500 of our Great Cormorant were perching on the giant ring in the middle of Dishui Lake. Driving along the sea wall, we saw a Red-throated Pipit eating seeds left over from the rice harvest, and in the mud below we found three bright-yellow taivana Eastern Yellow Wagtail.

Rather than drive back to the city, Elaine and I drove straight to Changxing Island and took the ferry to Hengsha. We spent Saturday night at Héngshā Bànrìxián Mínsù (横沙半日闲民宿; +86 135-0185-1814 and +86 150-2164-5467; 120 yuan).

Sunday brought 56 species on Hengsha and Chongming. Our stay of a little more than five hours on Hengsha revealed no extraordinary birds. Eurasian Bittern were unusually visible; 3 of the 5 we noted were standing more or less in the open.

We took the ferry back to Changxing Island, and there, sitting in traffic, I happened to look out the window of our Skoda Scout and saw 3 Goldcrest. We took the Shanghai-Changjiang Bridge across the Yangtze to Chongming.

After more than two weeks on Chongming, our Cinereous Vulture appear to be doing fine. Here they were yesterday.
After more than two weeks on Chongming, our Cinereous Vulture appear to be doing fine. Here they were yesterday.

The Cinereous Vulture were a few kilometers south of the place where we had found them eight days earlier. As before, the vultures were standing on an earthen bank along the first row of fields behind the canal at the base of the sea wall. Nearby were the Hooded Crane and 21 Common Crane. The cold, grey day was enlivened by a colorful flock of 55 Grey-capped Greenfinch.

Mew Gull and Lapland Longspur became the 267th and 268th species of bird Elaine and I have noted in the Shanghai region since 11 Sept. 2015.

Elaine Du at pond behind Holiday Inn, Nanhui, Shanghai, 30 Jan. 2016. Elaine and I use the Swarovski ATX-95 telescope mounted atop our Manfrotto MVH502AH video head and Manfrotto MT055CXPRO3 carbon-fiber tripod.
Elaine Du at pond behind Holiday Inn, Nanhui, Shanghai, 30 Jan. 2016. Elaine and I use the Swarovski ATX-95 telescope mounted atop our Manfrotto MVH502AH video head and Manfrotto MT055CXPRO3 carbon-fiber tripod.

List 1 of 1 for Sat. 30 Jan. 2016 (50 species). Around Pudong Nanhui Dongtan Wetland (Pǔdōng Nánhuì Dōngtān Shīdì [浦东南汇东滩湿地]), Shanghai, China (30.920507, 121.973159). List includes birds found at Dishui Lake (30.908702, 121.945124) and along Shijitang Road from 31.000204, 121.938145 S to Magic Parking Lot (30.882784, 121.972782). Cloudy; low 2°C, high 7°C. Visibility 10 km. Wind N 23 km/h. PM2.5 AQI: 78. Sunrise 06:48, sunset 17:28. SAT 30 JAN 2016 08:00-16:40. Craig Brelsford & Elaine Du.

Common Shelduck Tadorna tadorna 50
Falcated Duck Anas falcata 380
Eurasian Wigeon A. penelope 90
Eastern Spot-billed Duck A. zonorhyncha 210
Northern Shoveler A. clypeata 11
Northern Pintail A. acuta 350
Eurasian Teal A. crecca 10
Common Pochard Aythya ferina 170
Tufted Duck A. fuligula 45
Greater Scaup A. marila 8
Common Goldeneye Bucephala clangula 1
Common Pheasant Phasianus colchicus 1
Red-throated Loon Gavia stellata 1
Little Grebe Tachybaptus ruficollis 40
Great Crested Grebe Podiceps cristatus 80
Horned Grebe P. auritus 3
Eurasian Spoonbill Platalea leucorodia 78
Black-crowned Night Heron Nycticorax nycticorax 1
Grey Heron Ardea cinerea 23
Great Egret A. alba 11
Little Egret Egretta garzetta 36
Great Cormorant Phalacrocorax carbo ca. 600
Eastern Buzzard Buteo japonicus 1
White-breasted Waterhen Amaurornis phoenicurus 1
Common Moorhen Gallinula chloropus 5
Eurasian Coot Fulica atra 350
Common Snipe Gallinago gallinago 1
Eurasian Curlew Numenius arquata 5
Black-headed Gull Chroicocephalus ridibundus ca. 90
Mew Gull Larus canus ca. 50
Vega Gull Larus vegae vegae or L. v. mongolicus ca. 150
Peregrine Falcon Falco peregrinus 1
Long-tailed Shrike Lanius schach 11
Eurasian Magpie Pica pica 2
Plain Prinia Prinia inornata 1
Vinous-throated Parrotbill Sinosuthora webbiana 20
Crested Myna Acridotheres cristatellus 8
Pale Thrush Turdus pallidus 14
Dusky Thrush T. eunomus 1
Red-flanked Bluetail Tarsiger cyanurus 1
Daurian Redstart Phoenicurus auroreus 1
Eurasian Tree Sparrow Passer montanus ca. 50
Eastern Yellow Wagtail Motacilla tschutschensis 3 taivana
White Wagtail M. alba 16 (12 leucopsis, 4 ocularis)
Richard’s Pipit Anthus richardi 3
Red-throated Pipit A. cervinus 1
Buff-bellied Pipit A. rubescens japonicus 57
Yellow-throated Bunting Emberiza elegans 2
Black-faced Bunting E. spodocephala 2
Pallas’s Reed Bunting E. pallasi 8

Red-throated Pipit eating grain, Nanhui, 30 Jan. 2016.
Red-throated Pipit eating grain, Nanhui, 30 Jan. 2016.

List 1 of 2 for Sun. 31 Jan. 2016 (42 species). Hengsha Island (Héngshā Dǎo [横沙岛]), a small alluvial island at mouth of Yangtze River in Shanghai, China. S gate to birding area at 31.297333, 121.859434. Cloudy and windy, snow flurries in afternoon; low 0°C, high 5°C. Wind NNE 18 km/h. Visibility 10 km. PM2.5 AQI: 151. Sunrise 06:47, sunset 17:29. SUN 31 JAN 2016 07:10-12:20. Craig Brelsford & Elaine Du.

Common Shelduck Tadorna tadorna 1
Gadwall Anas strepera 590
Falcated Duck A. falcata 720
Eurasian Wigeon A. penelope 1
Eastern Spot-billed Duck A. zonorhyncha 6
Eurasian Teal A. crecca 5
Common Pochard Aythya ferina 4
Little Grebe Tachybaptus ruficollis 40
Great Crested Grebe Podiceps cristatus 2
Eurasian Bittern Botaurus stellaris 5
Grey Heron Ardea cinerea 30
Great Egret Ardea alba 6
Little Egret Egretta garzetta 25
Eastern Marsh Harrier Circus spilonotus 1
Hen Harrier C. cyaneus 3
Eastern Buzzard Buteo japonicus 2
Common Moorhen Gallinula chloropus 2
Eurasian Coot Fulica atra ca. 1300
Northern Lapwing Vanellus vanellus 40 (flock)
Spotted Redshank Tringa erythropus 6
Common Greenshank T. nebularia 2
Vega Gull Larus vegae vegae or L. v. mongolicus 55
Common Kestrel Falco tinnunculus 3
Merlin F. columbarius 1
Peregrine Falcon F. peregrinus 1
Long-tailed Shrike Lanius schach 18
Chinese Penduline Tit Remiz consobrinus 10
Eurasian Skylark Alauda arvensis 12
Light-vented Bulbul Pycnonotus sinensis 10
Goldcrest Regulus regulus 3 on Changxing Is.
Crested Myna Acridotheres cristatellus 8
Chinese Blackbird Turdus mandarinus 1
Dusky Thrush T. eunomus 3
Daurian Redstart Phoenicurus auroreus 2
Eastern Yellow Wagtail Motacilla tschutschensis 3 (2 taivana, 1 tschutschensis)
White Wagtail M. alba 15 (11 leucopsis, 4 ocularis)
Buff-bellied Pipit Anthus rubescens japonicus 12
Little Bunting Emberiza pusilla 4
Rustic Bunting E. rustica 2
Yellow-throated Bunting E. elegans 3
Black-faced Bunting E. spodocephala 1
Pallas’s Reed Bunting E. pallasi 17

List 2 of 2 for Sun. 31 Jan. 2016 (31 species). Around Chongming Dongtan National Bird Sanctuary and Nature Reserve (Chóngmíng Dōngtān Niǎolèi Guójiājí Zìrán Bǎohùqū [崇明东滩鸟类国家级自然保护区]), Chongming Island, Shanghai, China (31.510109, 121.961955). Cloudy and windy, snow flurries in afternoon; low 0°C, high 5°C. Wind NNE 18 km/h. Visibility 10 km. PM2.5 AQI: 151. Sunrise 06:47, sunset 17:29. SUN 31 JAN 2016 14:10-17:00. Craig Brelsford & Elaine Du.

Tundra Bean Goose Anser serrirostris 11 (flock)
Common Pheasant Phasianus colchicus 1
Little Grebe Tachybaptus ruficollis 15
Black-crowned Night Heron Nycticorax nycticorax 1
Grey Heron Ardea cinerea 3
Great Egret A. alba 1
Little Egret Egretta garzetta 10
Great Cormorant Phalacrocorax carbo 1
Cinereous Vulture Aegypius monachus 2
Hen Harrier Circus cyaneus 1
Eurasian Coot Fulica atra 4
Common Crane Grus grus 21
Hooded Crane G. monacha 65
Common Snipe Gallinago gallinago 2
Vega Gull Larus vegae vegae or L. v. mongolicus 1
Oriental Turtle Dove Streptopelia orientalis 1
Spotted Dove Spilopelia chinensis 2
Common Kestrel Falco tinnunculus 1
Merlin F. columbarius 1
Long-tailed Shrike Lanius schach 1
Eurasian Magpie Pica pica 8
Eurasian Skylark Alauda arvensis 8
Pale Thrush Turdus pallidus 3
Eurasian Tree Sparrow Passer montanus ca. 300
White Wagtail Motacilla alba 3 leucopsis
Olive-backed Pipit Anthus hodgsoni 10
Buff-bellied Pipit A. rubescens japonicus 9
Grey-capped Greenfinch Chloris sinica 55 (flock)
Little Bunting Emberiza pusilla 9
Pallas’s Reed Bunting E. pallasi 13
Lapland Longspur Calcarius lapponicus 6

Featured image: Its cover blown, this Eurasian Bittern Botaurus stellaris emerges from hiding on Hengsha Island, Shanghai, China, 31 Jan. 2015. Photo by Craig Brelsford using Nikon D3S, 600 mm + 1.4x TC, F/7.1, 1/400, ISO 1600.

Cinereous Vulture in Shanghai

On 23-24 Jan. Elaine and I noted 68 species on one of the coldest weekends in Shanghai in recent memory. We birded Chongming, the great alluvial island at the mouth of the Yangtze River, and Nanhui. With strong northwesterly winds making temperatures feel as cold as -16°C, many birds lay low, but the strange weather probably played a role in two extraordinary records: 2 Cinereous Vulture (Chongming) and 3 Red-throated Loon (Nanhui). Other notable records were 2 Horned Grebe at Dishui Lake and a winter record of Wood Sandpiper at Nanhui as well as Eastern Yellow Wagtail (taivana) and Red-throated Thrush on Chongming. On Chongming and at Nanhui, we had Red-throated Pipit and Water Pipit mixed in with Buff-bellied Pipit.

Listed as near threatened by IUCN, Cinereous Vulture breeds across Eurasia, from Spain to China. In China, Aegypius monachus breeds mainly in the west as well as in Hulunbeier in northeastern Inner Mongolia. It is a “sporadic” (MacKinnon) or “rare” (Brazil) winter visitor to the southeast China coast. The largest Old World vulture, it has a wing span of about 260 cm (8.5 ft).

From a distance, the huge vultures looked like dogs. They usually stayed close together.
From a distance, the huge vultures looked like dogs. They usually stayed close together.

From a distance, the huge vultures looked like dogs as they rested on the ground. The pair was approachable. They usually stayed close together. Their plumage was shiny, and they appeared healthy. I doubt, however, that the eastern end of Chongming Island is a place that can support a pair of these huge birds for long. A Chinese photographer we met said the Chongming pair was probably the same pair that had been reported recently in Nantong. As of Saturday, the vultures had been on Chongming for a week to 10 days.

According to the IUCN, only about 50 Red-throated Loon winter along the Chinese coast.
According to the IUCN, only about 50 Red-throated Loon winter along the Chinese coast.

Red-throated Loon is also known as Red-throated Diver. Gavia stellata breeds in tundra bogs and taiga pools above 50° N latitude in Eurasia and North America. It winters along the coasts of Europe, Asia, and North America. Though the species faces no global threat, it is rare in China, with IUCN estimating that less than 50 spend the winter on the Chinese coast. Two of our three birds were feeding in one of the few unfrozen fish ponds inside the sea wall. A third was not feeding, and our partner Michael Grunwell feared it had been contaminated by oil.

Elaine and I birded Chongming alone. On Sunday at Nanhui, Michael joined us. We car-birded both days, driving a Skoda Scout rented from Avis.

Cinereous Vulture and Red-throated Loon became the 265th and 266th species of bird that Elaine and I have noted in the Shanghai region since 11 Sept. 2015.

Michael Grunwell searching for Horned Grebe at Dishui Lake, Shanghai, 24 Jan. 2016.
Michael Grunwell searching for Horned Grebe at Dishui Lake, Shanghai, 24 Jan. 2016.

List 1 of 1 for Sat. 23 Jan. 2016 (51 species). Around Chongming Dongtan National Bird Sanctuary and Nature Reserve (Chóngmíng Dōngtān Niǎolèi Guójiājí Zìrán Bǎohùqū [崇明东滩鸟类国家级自然保护区]), Chongming Island, Shanghai, China (31.510109, 121.961955). Breezy and clear; low -8°C, high -1°C. Wind NW 32 km/h. Visibility 10 km. PM2.5 AQI: 70. Sunrise 06:51, sunset 17:22. SAT 23 JAN 2016 10:15-17:30. Craig Brelsford & Elaine Du.

Eurasian Wigeon Anas penelope 30
Mallard A. platyrhynchos 4
Eastern Spot-billed Duck A. zonorhyncha 30
Eurasian Teal A. crecca 20
Tufted Duck Aythya fuligula 64
Common Pheasant Phasianus colchicus 1
Little Grebe Tachybaptus ruficollis 4
Black-crowned Night Heron Nycticorax nycticorax 10
Grey Heron Ardea cinerea 3
Great Egret A. alba 2
Intermediate Egret Egretta intermedia 1
Little Egret E. garzetta 10
Great Cormorant Phalacrocorax carbo 42
Cinereous Vulture Aegypius monachus 2
Hen Harrier Circus cyaneus 1
Eurasian Coot Fulica atra 420
Pied Avocet Recurvirostra avosetta ca. 200
Northern Lapwing Vanellus vanellus 6
Grey Plover Pluvialis squatarola 340
Kentish Plover Charadrius alexandrinus 13
Common Snipe Gallinago gallinago 2
Eurasian Curlew Numenius arquata 445
Spotted Redshank Tringa erythropus 2
Common Greenshank T. nebularia 1
Common Sandpiper Actitis hypoleucos 2
Dunlin Calidris alpina 53
Black-tailed Gull Larus crassirostris 9
Vega Gull Larus vegae vegae or L. v. mongolicus 4
Oriental Turtle Dove Streptopelia orientalis 1
Spotted Dove Spilopelia chinensis 4
Eurasian Hoopoe Upupa epops 1
Common Kestrel Falco tinnunculus 1
Long-tailed Shrike Lanius schach 1
Eurasian Magpie Pica pica 5
Light-vented Bulbul Pycnonotus sinensis 3
Vinous-throated Parrotbill Sinosuthora webbiana 20
Crested Myna Acridotheres cristatellus 15
Pale Thrush Turdus pallidus 6
Red-throated Thrush T. ruficollis 1
Naumann’s Thrush T. naumanni 1
Dusky Thrush T. eunomus 2
Daurian Redstart Phoenicurus auroreus 6
Eurasian Tree Sparrow Passer montanus ca. 600
Eastern Yellow Wagtail Motacilla tschutschensis 1 taivana
White Wagtail Motacilla alba 5 leucopsis
Richard’s Pipit Anthus richardi 1
Olive-backed Pipit A. hodgsoni 13
Red-throated Pipit A. cervinus 2
Buff-bellied Pipit A. rubescens japonicus 65
Water Pipit A. spinoletta blakistoni 1
Black-faced Bunting Emberiza spodocephala 4

Mixed in with the Buff-bellied Pipit were Red-throated Pipit (above) and Water Pipit.
Mixed in with the Buff-bellied Pipit were Red-throated Pipit (above) and Water Pipit.

List 1 of 1 for Sun. 24 Jan. 2016 (50 species). Around Pudong Nanhui Dongtan Wetland (Pǔdōng Nánhuì Dōngtān Shīdì [浦东南汇东滩湿地]), Shanghai, China (30.920507, 121.973159). List includes birds found at Dishui Lake (30.908702, 121.945124) and along Shijitang Road from 31.000204, 121.938145 S to 30.851114, 121.848527. Blustery, cold, and sunny; low -8°C, high -6°C. Visibility 10 km. Wind NW 40 km/h. PM2.5 AQI: 68. Sunrise 06:51, sunset 17:23. SUN 24 JAN 2016 07:15-16:30. Craig Brelsford, Elaine Du, & Michael Grunwell.

Falcated Duck Anas falcata 60
Eurasian Wigeon A. penelope 20
Mallard A. platyrhynchos 2
Eastern Spot-billed Duck A. zonorhyncha 45
Common Pochard Aythya ferina 32
Tufted Duck A. fuligula 20
Common Pheasant Phasianus colchicus 1
Red-throated Loon Gavia stellata 3
Little Grebe Tachybaptus ruficollis 80
Great Crested Grebe Podiceps cristatus 55
Horned Grebe P. auritus 2
Eurasian Spoonbill Platalea leucorodia 60
Black-crowned Night Heron Nycticorax nycticorax 2
Grey Heron Ardea cinerea 80
Great Egret A. alba 3
Intermediate Egret Egretta intermedia 1
Little Egret E. garzetta 12
Great Cormorant Phalacrocorax carbo ca. 300
Common Moorhen Gallinula chloropus 3
Eurasian Coot Fulica atra ca. 300
Northern Lapwing Vanellus vanellus 3
Kentish Plover Charadrius alexandrinus 15
Common Snipe Gallinago gallinago 7
Green Sandpiper Tringa ochropus 4
Wood Sandpiper T. glareola 1
Dunlin Calidris alpina ca. 300
Black-headed Gull Chroicocephalus ridibundus 25
Vega Gull Larus vegae vegae or L. v. mongolicus 10
Feral Pigeon (Rock Dove) Columba livia 1
Spotted Dove Spilopelia chinensis 6
Common Kingfisher Alcedo atthis 1
Peregrine Falcon Falco peregrinus 2
Long-tailed Shrike Lanius schach 10
Eurasian Magpie Pica pica 1
Eurasian/Oriental Skylark Alauda arvensis/A. gulgula 1
Zitting Cisticola Cisticola juncidis 1
Vinous-throated Parrotbill Sinosuthora webbiana 20
Crested Myna Acridotheres cristatellus 6
Pale Thrush Turdus pallidus 7
Dusky Thrush T. eunomus 1
Red-flanked Bluetail Tarsiger cyanurus 2
Daurian Redstart Phoenicurus auroreus 10
Eurasian Tree Sparrow Passer montanus ca. 200
White Wagtail Motacilla alba 12 (9 leucopsis, 3 lugens)
Richard’s Pipit Anthus richardi 2
Red-throated Pipit A. cervinus 6
Buff-bellied Pipit A. rubescens japonicus ca. 200
Water Pipit A. spinoletta blakistoni 1
Little Bunting Emberiza pusilla 15
Black-faced Bunting E. spodocephala 1

Blustery winds made for tough birding. Here, Dishui Lake looks like a surging Arctic sea. Note Black-headed Gull flying in background.
Blustery winds made for tough birding. Here, Dishui Lake looks like a surging Arctic sea. Note Black-headed Gull flying in background.

Featured image: Cinereous Vulture Aegypius monachus, Chongming Island, Shanghai, 23 Jan. 2016. Photographed using Nikon D3S and Nikkor VR 600mm F/4G lens mounted atop Manfrotto 055 carbon-fiber tripod and MVH502AH video head. F/9, 1/1250, ISO 2000.