‘One of My All-time Ornithological Highlights’

“I have thought a lot about yesterday and can honestly say, it must be one of my all-time ornithological highlights.”

— Dr. Mike May, message to Craig Brelsford, 14 May 2017

Those are the words not of a new birder, but of a highly experienced visiting birder with thousands of birds on his life list who resides in bird-rich Extremadura, Spain.

Birding Cape Nanhui at the height of the spring migration left Mike May open-mouthed. Should anyone be surprised? The southeastern-most point of Shanghai is a world-class birding site.

Orange-headed Thrush Geokichla citrina, Cape Nanhui, 13 May 2017. (Craig Brelsford)
Orange-headed Thrush Geokichla citrina made a thrilling appearance 13 May 2017 at the Photographers’ Corner at the Magic Parking Lot (30.884898, 121.968229). (Craig Brelsford)

Mike’s 92-species day, Sat. 13 May 2017, with Beijing-based Swedish birder Jan-Erik Nilsén and me included ultra-rarities such as Orange-headed Thrush as well as Pallas’s Grasshopper Warbler and Lanceolated Warbler. A pair of sub-adult Black-faced Spoonbill were getting by on the ever-shrinking pools at the beleaguered site.

The eBird list for Pudong Nanhui Dongtan Wetland.
The eBird list for Pudong Nanhui Dongtan Wetland. Submit your own records! It’s fun!

These records brought the all-time list for Cape Nanhui to 288 species, according to eBird–making Cape Nanhui the second-hottest birding hot spot in China.

Let me say that again: Of the thousands of birding spots in this vast, mega-diverse nation, the cape 60 km southeast of People’s Square is second only to Baihualing in Yunnan in species noted.

Sound unbelievable? Let me say something even more unbelievable: Not only is this rich spot completely unprotected, with not even a square meter preserved in any legal way; but it is, to the contrary, being actively destroyed, even as I tap out these words.

The backdrop to the work of Mike, Jan-Erik, and me was fleets of bulldozers and backhoes, busy throughout the weekend. They clattered and clanged, and the pumps transferring water into the newly dug canals whirred and chugged.

Mike May (R) and Zhāng Dōngshēng (张东升) meet. Dōngshēng, a professor at Shanghai Ocean University, is leading an effort to conserve Cape Nanhui.
Mike May (R) and Zhāng Dōngshēng (张东升) meet. Dōngshēng, a professor at Shanghai Ocean University, is leading an effort to conserve Cape Nanhui. (Craig Brelsford)

The pace of transformation is faster than ever now.

“Nanhui is gone,” my partners and I said.

A major ecological area, a place combining ease of access to millions of residents of Earth’s largest city and a favorable position on Earth’s greatest migratory flyway, is being utterly transformed.

While the Cape Nanhui that I have long known falls, huge tracts of adjacent tidal mudflat are being reclaimed, adding dozens of square kilometers to the land area of Cape Nanhui. Birding there in theory could have a future. A Cape Nanhui Nature Reserve could be set up in the new area.

Where Black-faced Spoonbill once foraged, digging machines now crawl, transforming critical reed-bed and marshland habitat into an artificial forest. Looming in the background is the brand-new satellite city, Lingang. Nanhui, Shanghai, 26 March 2015.
Where Black-faced Spoonbill once foraged, digging machines now crawl. Where once one savored the sound of Marsh Grassbird and Reed Parrotbill, now one cringes at the clanging of machines. No place in mainland Shanghai matches Cape Nanhui as a magnet to migrating birds. Cape Nanhui is one of the best birding hot spots in China, and it is not only completely unprotected, but it is being actively destroyed.

But even as the Cape Nanhui we know falls, no one, to my knowledge, has hastened to reassure conservationists that areas in the newly reclaimed land will be set aside for birds.

In the city-province of Shanghai, which is the size of the U.S. state of Delaware, a few places have indeed been set aside, among them Chongming Dongtan. But those reserves are small, on remote islands far from mainland Shanghai, and practically unreachable by the millions of middle-class Shanghainese who lack a car.

Cape Nanhui, by contrast, is easily reachable from the city. And it is the one place where masses of bird lovers can conveniently get a taste of the grand spectacle that is spring migration along the east coast of the Eurasian supercontinent.

That opportunity is being taken away, not only from the birders alive today, but also from the birders of the future.

THE THRILL OF NANHUI IN MAY

Lesser Coucal takes off. Cape Nanhui, 14 May 2017. (Craig Brelsford)
Lesser Coucal takes off. Centropus bengalensis breeds in Earth’s greatest city. Recently, shanghaibirding.com examined Lesser Coucal and the other Cuckoos of Shanghai. (Craig Brelsford)

Our agony over the fate of Nanhui was tempered by the joy of birding. Orange-headed Thrush showed up Saturday at the Magic Parking Lot (30.884898, 121.968229). With the two vertical bars on its face, our specimen was either of race melli (breeds Guangdong, etc.) or courtoisi (Anhui).

On Sunday the Magic Parking Lot delivered singing Grey-crowned Warbler Seicercus tephrocephalus, and in Microforest 2 (30.926013, 121.970705) an appearance was made by Alström’s Warbler S. soror. Neither breeds in the region; both are very rare vagrants to Shanghai.

Iron Track (31.003613, 121.907883) gave us singing Yellow-breasted Bunting in full breeding finery and singing Pallas’s Grasshopper Warbler. I captured the latter’s song, rarely heard in Shanghai.

Pallas’s Grasshopper Warbler Locustella certhiola, 13 May 2017, Iron Track (31.003613, 121.907883) (00:13; 2.1 MB)

The Marshy Agricultural Land (30.850707, 121.863662) near Eiffel Tower was highly productive, yielding Lanceolated Warbler, Forest Wagtail, and Striated Heron.

Varities of Eastern Yellow Wagtail. L: 'Green-headed Wagtail' Motacilla tschutschensis taivana. R: 'Alaska Wagtail' Motacilla tschutschensis tschutschensis. Both photographed within a few meters of each other dry rice paddies at Cape Nanhui, 13 May 2017. (Craig Brelsford)
Varieties of Eastern Yellow Wagtail. L: ‘Green-headed Wagtail’ Motacilla tschutschensis taivana. R: ‘Alaska Wagtail’ M. t. tschutschensis. Both photographed on dry rice paddies at Cape Nanhui, 13 May 2017. (Craig Brelsford)

Other highlights from Saturday along the 30-km stretch of coastline:

Yellow Bittern 2
Chinese Egret 14
Pacific Golden Plover 1
Pheasant-tailed Jacana 1
Black-tailed Godwit 17
Grey-tailed Tattler 2
White-winged Tern 260
Lesser Coucal 1
Common Cuckoo 12 singing
Tiger Shrike 4
Sand Martin ca. 300
Collared Finchbill 2
Arctic Warbler 5 singing
Thick-billed Warbler 1
Marsh Grassbird 2 singing
Forest Wagtail 1

Complete checklist here.

Sunday saw Jan-Erik and me note 78 species.

L-R: Jan-Erik Nilsn, Charles Wu, and 12-year-old birder Young Jack Han view Tiger Shrike in Microforest 4, 14 May 2017. (Craig Brelsford)
L-R: Jan-Erik Nilsén, Charles Wu, and 12-year-old birder Jack Han view Tiger Shrike in Microforest 4, 14 May 2017. (Craig Brelsford)

Highlights:

Japanese Sparrowhawk 1
Sharp-tailed Sandpiper 350
Dunlin 350
Oriental Pratincole 3
Little Tern 5
Hair-crested Drongo 8
Dusky Warbler 1
Taiga Flycatcher 1
Pechora Pipit 17 singing

Complete checklist here.

A DISCUSSION ABOUT SEICERCUS

Per's PDF
Some of the more challenging Seicercus warblers. This graphic was created by Shanghai Birding member Per Alström for a presentation he made to the Beijing Birdwatching Society in 2012. The PDF is downloadable through shanghaibirding.com.

Shanghai Birding is the WeChat companion to this Web site. Our 126 members include everyone from persons brand-new to birding to some of the most knowledgeable birders in China. We discuss everything from the most common species to the most arcane.

You can join Shanghai Birding. Just friend me on WeChat (WeChat ID: craigbrelsford). Let me know that you want to join Shanghai Birding. I will add you.

Here is an edited transcript of a recent conversation on Shanghai Birding about the Seicercus warblers at Cape Nanhui:

Join Shanghai Birding for the very latest bird sightings in Shanghai.
Join Shanghai Birding for the very latest bird sightings in Shanghai.

Paul Holt: Can you post your recording of yesterday’s [14 May 2017] Alström’s Warbler as well please, Craig?

Craig Brelsford: Will post after I get home. Meanwhile, have you assessed the recording I posted yesterday morning? Do you agree it’s Grey-crowned Warbler? Jonathan Martinez, I’d like your view, too!

Craig Brelsford had earlier posted these sound recordings:

Grey-crowned Warbler Seicercus tephrocephalus 1/3, 14 May 2017, Magic Parking Lot (30.884898, 121.968229), Nanhui (00:36; 3 MB)

Grey-crowned Warbler 2/3 (00:49; 3.6 MB)

Grey-crowned Warbler 3/3 (01:08; 4.3 MB)

PH: Yes, Grey-crowned Warbler!

PH: For what it’s worth, while there are probably 30+ records of “golden-spectacled warblers” from coastal Hebei, very, very few have been as well documented as Craig’s and team’s recent Grey-crowned. Many have been photographed but far fewer sound-recorded. Alström’s is so far the only one so far known to breed north of the Qinling Shan (it’s a scarce and very local breeder at two, possibly three, sites in Beijing). Personally I’ve never seen soror in coastal Hebei (nor am I aware of any being sound-recorded there), but I have noted (and sound-recorded) 2 Bianchi’s S. valentini and 1 Martens’s S. omeiensis in coastal Hebei. I understand that the only (?) three coastal Hebei birds that have been captured and had their DNA compared have all been omeiensis. We’re very, very far from ascertaining the true statuses of these Seicercus in our area, but you perhaps should/might see more in Shanghai and coastal Zhejiang. As many of you already know, there are some excellent sound recordings of these on Per’s site.

CB: Great analysis, Paul, and great that you point out the resources on Per’s site. Jan-Erik and I got good sound recordings of the purported soror yesterday, and Charles Wu and I got some good shots, among them images of the outer tail feathers, which definitely had some white in them.

CB: Grey-crowned Warbler appeared in the microforests almost exactly a year ago: http://www.shanghaibirding.com/2016/05/20/great-records/

PH: Excellent, Craig. As you know they’ve all got white in their outer tails. Alström’s (aka Plain-tailed) doesn’t have much …

Alstrom's Warbler with splayed tail feathers. Craig Brelsford
Alström’s Warbler with splayed tail feathers. (Craig Brelsford)

CB: Right, Paul; thanks. The discussion yesterday was one of comparison and degree. How little must the white be in the tail, we were asking ourselves, for a Seicercus to “qualify” as Alström’s/Plain-tailed? Was the white in our photos a little or a lot? We ended up thinking a little, and that and the song we recorded led us to a determination of soror. I’ll post my photos and recordings as soon as I’m home.

PH: Personally, Craig, I find it very difficult to judge the amount and distribution of white on the tails of these Seicercus in the field and think that a good photo with the tail splayed would really be necessary. Even then, the differences are small and subtle. Tricky group!

Jonathan Martinez: Regarding the ID of these Seicercus, I have found that call is by far the easiest way to ID them. They all have a characteristic call. Some of them, like Alström’s or Bianchi’s, are usually quite vocal; others not as much. It requires much more experience or use of sonogram to ID them by song, but a few of them (Alström’s especially) include their call in their song, and some of them (Grey-crowned, Martens’s) include a trill in their song. Others do not (Alström, Bianchi’s). ID-ing them on plumage is, of course, a level up.

Alstrom's Warbler, Microforest 2, 14 May 2017. (Craig Brelsford)
Alström’s Warbler Seicercus soror, Microforest 2, 14 May 2017. (Craig Brelsford)

Here is the voice of the Alström’s Warbler that I recorded with my Olympus DM-650 pocket recorder:

Alström’s Warbler Seicercus soror 1/4, 14 May 2017, Microforest 2 (30.926013, 121.970705), Nanhui (00:50; 3.6 MB)

Alström’s Warbler 2/4 (00:08; 1.9 MB)

Alström’s Warbler 3/4 (01:08; 4.3 MB)

Alström’s Warbler 4/4 (00:41; 3.2 MB)

Featured image: Visiting British birder Mike May uses Craig Brelsford’s spotting scope to scan for birds at Cape Nanhui, Shanghai, 13 May 2017. (Craig Brelsford)

Reed Parrotbill, Symbol of Shanghai

Did you know that Shanghai is going to have a municipal bird? Guess what the two main candidates are: Light-vented Bulbul and Reed Parrotbill. Although I can understand why Light-vented Bulbul needs to be in the running, Reed Parrotbill is clearly the better choice. Let me tell you why.

Reed Parrotbill, Iron Track, 5 Nov. 2016.
Reed Parrotbill, lively little sprite of the Shanghai reed beds. Iron Track (31.003613, 121.907883), Pudong, 5 Nov. 2016. (Craig Brelsford)

The argument for Light-vented Bulbul is that it is a bird of the people. As the versatile little bird lives even in the deepest recesses of the urban jungle, many Shanghai residents are familiar with it. Reed Parrotbill, by contrast, is less well-known.

One reason Reed Parrotbill is less known, of course, is that the reeds that used to cover the coastline and line the banks of the Yangtze River are disappearing. The disappearance of those reeds is perhaps the best reason to make Reed Parrotbill the municipal bird.

Reed Parrotbill, Iron Track, Nanhui, 5 Nov. 2016.
Reed Parrotbill is a curious little bird and will often shimmy up the reed to see what’s going on. Iron Track, 5 Nov. 2016. (Craig Brelsford)

The choice of Reed Parrotbill would be a bold endorsement of Natural Shanghai, the city at the mouth of Asia’s greatest river and on Earth’s greatest migratory flyway. It would be a way of saying that Earth’s largest city values not only Reed Parrotbill but also the threatened habitat in which Reed Parrotbill lives.

The choice of Light-vented Bulbul, by contrast, would constitute a failure of imagination. It would be not a celebration of Natural Shanghai but a ratification of the environmental degradation afflicting this city. Light-vented Bulbul is a species that thrives in the degraded habitats that are all too common in Shanghai.

Reed Parrotbill, Nanhui, 17 May 2016.
In breeding season Reed Parrotbill is more conspicuous than at other times of the year. Here’s one in the reeds near Microforest 2, Nanhui, 17 May 2016. (Craig Brelsford)

The choice of Reed Parrotbill for municipal bird is far more than a political statement. The bird is full of personality and is beautiful, with rusty flanks, a grey head with a long black eyebrow, and a big yellow bill. The latter it uses to pry open reeds to get the insect larvae inside.

Reed Parrotbill is not a birder's bird but the people's bird. It is a species totally dependent on reeds, a plant that is part of the very fabric of Shanghai.
Reed Parrotbill is not just a birder’s bird but is the people’s bird. Paradoxornis heudei is a species totally dependent on reeds, a plant that is part of the very fabric of Shanghai. Reed Parrotbill represents well the natural heritage of Earth’s greatest city. Nanhui, 30 March 2014. (Craig Brelsford)

Reed Parrotbill has a varied repertoire of calls, all lively and colorful. To this day the calls and song of this species are among the most common bird sounds heard at Nanhui and on Hengsha Island and Chongming Island.

The chirr sound is perhaps the best-known. I recorded all the sounds below at Nanhui, with the exception of “siren,” recorded on Chongming. Enjoy them and get to know Shanghai’s best choice for municipal bird, Reed Parrotbill.

chirr (00:03; 930 KB)

insistent (00:05; 1 MB)

plaintive (00:04; 958 KB)

merry (00:20; 1.6 MB)

siren (00:04; 954 KB)

CONSERVATION STATUS

Because of the continued degradation and reclamation of the reed-bed habitat on which it is totally dependent, Reed Parrotbill Paradoxornis heudei is listed by IUCN as Near Threatened. In Chinese it is known as “Chinese Parrotbill” (Zhèndàn Yāquè, 震旦鸦雀). Nearly its entire range is in China, from Heilongjiang south to Zhejiang. Small parts of its distribution spill over into Mongolia and the Russian Far East.

WHAT DO YOU THINK?

Do you agree that Reed Parrotbill should be the municipal bird of Shanghai? Would you prefer another species? Readers want to know what you think! Leave a comment below.

115 SPECIES AT PUDONG SITES

Our partner Mike May got this image of a Yellow-breasted Bunting feeding on rice near Luchao. The endangered buntings were found at the spot we call the Marshy Agricultural Land (). On 5 Nov. 2016 we first found Yellow-breasted Bunting there. We returned on 8 Nov., when Mike got this shot, as well as 9 Nov., finding the species there each time.
Our partner Mike May got this image of a Yellow-breasted Bunting feeding on rice near Luchao. The endangered bunting was found at the spot we call the Marshy Agricultural Land (30.850707, 121.863662). On 5 Nov. 2016 we first found Yellow-breasted Bunting there. We returned on 8 Nov., when Mike got this shot, as well as 9 Nov., finding the species there each time.

Since last we posted, Elaine Du and I birded three days: Sat. 5 Nov., Tues. 8 Nov., and Wed. 9 Nov. 2016. We noted 115 species. At Nanhui’s defunct nature reserve (30.920507, 121.973159) we had Long-billed Dowitcher and Endangered Great Knot, and we noted the continued presence there of Endangered Black-faced Spoonbill. Dishui Lake (30.908702, 121.945124) yielded Smew, Greater ScaupBlack-necked Grebe, and an uncommon Shanghai record of Black Kite. We had Reed Parrotbill and Brown-cheeked Rail at a new site called the Iron Track (31.003613, 121.907883), and we went three-for-three with Endangered Yellow-breasted Bunting at a point (30.850707, 121.863662) north of Luchao, where we also attained an autumn record of Black-browed Reed Warbler. Drives along the sea-wall road gave us Amur Falcon and Peregrine Falcon, and Japanese Sparrowhawk dove for cover into Microforest 7.

Amur Falcon, 2 of 3 noted by us on 5 Nov. 2016 at Nanhui.
Amur Falcon, 2 of the 3 noted by us on 5 Nov. 2016 at Nanhui. (Craig Brelsford)

We found Tundra Swan (bewickii) on all three days, with a high count of 11 on 9 Nov. on the mudflats near Big Bend (31.000321, 121.938074). The previous evening near Big Bend we had a rare Shanghai record of Greater White-fronted Goose. In the mudflats north of South Lock (30.860073, 121.909997) we had Eurasian Curlew and a rare Shanghai record of Mew Gull Larus canus.

Among shorebirds, Dunlin and Kentish Plover not surprisingly were the most numerous. Careful scanning allowed us to sift out more southerly winterers such as the Great Knot as well as small numbers of Black-tailed Godwit, Broad-billed Sandpiper, Red-necked Stint, and Sanderling. Vulnerable Saunders’s Gull were at the defunct nature reserve.

Microforest 4 yielded Japanese Robin on 7 Nov., seen and photographed by Shanghai birder kaca. A careful search by us the following two days failed to turn up the rare passage migrant. On 5 Nov. we had a late record of Arctic Warbler. Other interesting passerines were Hair-crested Drongo and Naumann’s Thrush. Scaly-breasted Munia was at the Iron Track, we had season’s first Rustic Bunting, and the skies gave us Red-rumped Swallow and Asian House Martin.

On 5 Nov. Elaine and I were joined by Michael Grunwell, the Shanghai-based veteran British birder. On 8 Nov. we welcomed U.K. birder Mike May, and on 9 Nov. we partnered with U.S. birder Erica Locke.

PLEASE REPORT ABUSE

On 8 Nov. we found a bird photographer with a cage baited with mealworms. We asked him politely but firmly to put the cage away, and he complied. If you see persons trapping or otherwise abusing birds at Nanhui, call the forestry department at 21-51586246 or the Pudong New Area Wildlife Protection Station at 21-61872122.

Hair-crested Drongo is an uncommon passage migrant in Shanghai. Photo by Mike May.
Hair-crested Drongo is an uncommon passage migrant in Shanghai. Photo by Mike May.

Day Lists
Lists are generated on eBird then adjusted to comport with my first reference, the IOC World Bird List.

List 1 of 2 for Sat. 5 Nov. 2016 (6 species). Birds noted at sod farm south of Pudong International Airport (31.112586, 121.824742), Pudong, Shanghai, China. Sunny and hazy/smoggy. Low 12° C, high 22° C. Humidity 88%. Visibility: 10 km. Wind SSE 6 km/h. PM2.5 AQI: 176 (unhealthful). Sunrise 06:14, sunset 17:01. SAT 05 NOV 2016 06:40-07:10. Craig Brelsford, Elaine Du, & Michael Grunwell.

Eastern Cattle Egret Bubulcus coromandus 3
Eurasian/Oriental Skylark Alauda arvensis/gulgula 8
White Wagtail Motacilla alba 5
Richard’s Pipit Anthus richardi 1
Red-throated Pipit A. cervinus 2
Buff-bellied Pipit A. rubescens 8

List 2 of 2 for Sat. 5 Nov. 2016 (85 species)

Yellow-throated Bunting, Nanhui, 5 Nov. 2016.
Yellow-throated Bunting, Nanhui, 5 Nov. 2016. (Craig Brelsford)

Birds noted around Pudong Nanhui Dongtan Wetland (Pǔdōng Nánhuì Dōngtān Shīdì [浦东南汇东滩湿地]; 30.920507, 121.973159), Pudong, Shanghai, China. List includes birds found at Dishui Lake (30.908702, 121.945124). We covered the entire coastal road from Luchao (Lúcháo Gǎng [芦潮港]; 30.851109, 121.848455) to Binhai (Bīnhǎi Zhèn [滨海镇]; 31.006250, 121.885558). Among the points along this 30 km stretch of coast are the Iron Track (31.003613, 121.907883), Big Bend (31.000321, 121.938074), Microforest 4 (30.953225, 121.959083), Microforest 1 (30.923889, 121.971635), the Magic Parking Lot (30.884898, 121.968229), the Magic GPS Point (30.880563, 121.964551), South Lock (30.860073, 121.909997), the Eiffel Tower (30.850531, 121.878047), & the Marshy Agricultural Land (30.850707, 121.863662). Sunny & hazy/smoggy. Low 12° C, high 22° C. Humidity 88%. Visibility: 10 km. Wind SSE 6 km/h. PM2.5 AQI: 176 (unhealthful). Sunrise 06:14, sunset 17:01. SAT 05 NOV 2016 07:30-17:30. Craig Brelsford, Elaine Du, & Michael Grunwell.

Tundra Swan Cygnus columbianus 1 juv.
Falcated Duck Anas falcata 76
Eurasian Wigeon A. penelope 12
Eastern Spot-billed Duck A. zonorhyncha 45
Eurasian Teal A. crecca 1
Common Pochard Aythya ferina 7
Tufted Duck A. fuligula 16
Common Pheasant Phasianus colchicus 2
Little Grebe Tachybaptus ruficollis 35
Great Crested Grebe Podiceps cristatus 20
Black-necked Grebe P. nigricollis 1
Great Cormorant Phalacrocorax carbo 40
Eurasian Bittern Botaurus stellaris 1
Grey Heron Ardea cinerea 70
Great Egret A. alba 5
Intermediate Egret A. intermedia 1
Little Egret Egretta garzetta 50
Black-crowned Night Heron Nycticorax nycticorax 7
Eurasian Spoonbill Platalea leucorodia 28
Black-faced Spoonbill P. minor 45
Eurasian/Black-faced Spoonbill P. leucorodia/minor 30
Western Osprey Pandion haliaetus 2
Hen Harrier Circus cyaneus 1
Black Kite Milvus migrans 1
Eastern Buzzard Buteo japonicus 1
Brown-cheeked Rail Rallus indicus 1
rail sp. 2
Common Moorhen Gallinula chloropus 2
Eurasian Coot Fulica atra 30
Pied Avocet Recurvirostra avosetta 37
Grey Plover Pluvialis squatarola 20
Lesser Sand Plover Charadrius mongolus 8
Kentish Plover C. alexandrinus 330
Little Ringed Plover C. dubius 1
Broad-billed Sandpiper Calidris falcinellus 3
Red-necked Stint C. ruficollis 8
Sanderling C. alba 5
Dunlin C. alpina 330
Long-billed Dowitcher Limnodromus scolopaceus 1
Common Snipe Gallinago gallinago 3
Spotted Redshank Tringa erythropus 33
Common Greenshank T. nebularia 40
Saunders’s Gull Chroicocephalus saundersi 3
Feral Pigeon (Rock Dove) Columba livia 2
Oriental Turtle Dove Streptopelia orientalis 7
Spotted Dove S. chinensis 6
Common Kingfisher Alcedo atthis 2
Amur Falcon Falco amurensis 3
Long-tailed Shrike Lanius schach 26
Eurasian/Oriental Skylark Alauda arvensis/gulgula 8
Barn Swallow Hirundo rustica 20
Chinese Penduline Tit Remiz consobrinus ca. 100
Light-vented Bulbul Pycnonotus sinensis 25
Japanese/Manchurian Bush Warbler Horornis diphone canturians/H. borealis borealis 1
Pallas’s Leaf Warbler Phylloscopus proregulus 4
Yellow-browed Warbler P. inornatus 6
Arctic/Kamchatka Leaf/Japanese Leaf Warbler P. borealis/examinandus/xanthodryas 1
Black-browed Reed Warbler Acrocephalus bistrigiceps 2
Plain Prinia Prinia inornata 10
Reed Parrotbill Paradoxornis heudei 12
Vinous-throated Parrotbill Sinosuthora webbiana 45
Crested Myna Acridotheres cristatellus 3
White’s Thrush Zoothera aurea 6
Grey-backed Thrush Turdus hortulorum 1
Japanese Thrush T. cardis 7
Eyebrowed Thrush T. obscurus 1
Pale Thrush T. pallidus 8
Dusky Thrush T. eunomus 9
Rufous-tailed Robin Larvivora sibilans 1
Red-flanked Bluetail Tarsiger cyanurus 22
Mugimaki Flycatcher Ficedula mugimaki 4
Daurian Redstart Phoenicurus auroreus 30
Stejneger’s Stonechat Saxicola stejnegeri 1
Eurasian Tree Sparrow Passer montanus 50
Scaly-breasted Munia Lonchura punctulata 1
White Wagtail Motacilla alba 17
Richard’s Pipit Anthus richardi 4
Buff-bellied Pipit A. rubescens 16
Brambling Fringilla montifringilla 6
Tristram’s Bunting Emberiza tristrami 2
Chestnut-eared Bunting E. fucata 15
Little Bunting E. pusilla 3
Rustic Bunting E. rustica 1
Yellow-throated Bunting E. elegans 10
Yellow-breasted Bunting E. aureola 4
Black-faced Bunting E. spodocephala 12
Pallas’s Reed Bunting E. pallasi 6

List 1 of 1 for Tues. 8 Nov. 2016 (75 species)

Greater White-fronted Goose, Nanhui, 8 Nov. 2016. Rare Shanghai record.
Greater White-fronted Goose, Nanhui, 8 Nov. 2016. Rare Shanghai record. Digiscoped images by Elaine Du using Swarovski ATX-95 scope and iPhone 6.

Birds noted around Pudong Nanhui Dongtan Wetland (Pǔdōng Nánhuì Dōngtān Shīdì [浦东南汇东滩湿地]; 30.920507, 121.973159), Pudong, Shanghai, China. List includes birds found at Dishui Lake (30.908702, 121.945124). We covered the entire coastal road from Luchao (Lúcháo Gǎng [芦潮港]; 30.851109, 121.848455) to Binhai (Bīnhǎi Zhèn [滨海镇]; 31.006250, 121.885558). Among the points along this 30 km stretch of coast are the Iron Track (31.003613, 121.907883), Big Bend (31.000321, 121.938074), Microforest 4 (30.953225, 121.959083), Microforest 1 (30.923889, 121.971635), the Magic Parking Lot (30.884898, 121.968229), the Magic GPS Point (30.880563, 121.964551), South Lock (30.860073, 121.909997), the Eiffel Tower (30.850531, 121.878047), & the Marshy Agricultural Land (30.850707, 121.863662). Early rain, turning cloudy. Windy  throughout day. Low 12° C, high 17° C. Humidity 69%. Visibility: 10 km. Wind N 30-40 km/h. PM2.5 AQI: 68 (moderate). Sunrise 06:16, sunset 16:59. TUE 08 NOV 2016 06:40-17:50. Craig Brelsford, Elaine Du, & Mike May.

Greater White-fronted Goose Anser albifrons 15
Tundra Swan Cygnus columbianus bewickii 1 juv.
Falcated Duck Anas falcata 80
Eurasian Wigeon A. penelope 84
Mallard A. platyrhynchos 8
Eastern Spot-billed Duck A. zonorhyncha ca. 500
Northern Pintail A. acuta 20
Eurasian Teal A. crecca 12
Common Pochard Aythya ferina 2
Tufted Duck A. fuligula 80
Common Pheasant Phasianus colchicus 1
Little Grebe Tachybaptus ruficollis 45
Great Crested Grebe Podiceps cristatus 20
Great Cormorant Eurasian Phalacrocorax carbo 60
Grey Heron Ardea cinerea 40
Great Egret A. alba 5
Little Egret Egretta garzetta 200
Eastern Cattle Egret Bubulcus coromandus 1
Chinese Pond Heron Ardeola bacchus 4
Black-crowned Night Heron Nycticorax nycticorax 12
Black-faced Spoonbill Platalea minor 1
Eurasian/Black-faced Spoonbill P. leucorodia/minor 60 distant, bills tucked in
Japanese Sparrowhawk Accipiter gularis 1
White-breasted Waterhen Amaurornis phoenicurus 1
Common Moorhen Gallinula chloropus 1
Eurasian Coot Fulica atra 20
Kentish Plover Charadrius alexandrinus 10
Eurasian Curlew Numenius arquata 13
Dunlin Calidris alpina 20
Common Snipe Gallinago gallinago 4
Spotted Redshank Tringa erythropus 70
Common Greenshank T. nebularia 30
Marsh Sandpiper T. stagnatilis 1
Black-headed Gull Chroicocephalus ridibundus 8
Black-tailed Gull Larus crassirostris 8
Mew Gull Larus canus 1
Vega Gull Vega Larus vegae vegae/L. v. mongolicus 3
Caspian Tern Hydroprogne caspia 2
Feral Pigeon (Rock Dove) Columba livia 4
Oriental Turtle Dove Streptopelia orientalis 12
Spotted Dove S. chinensis 8
Eurasian Hoopoe Upupa epops 1
Common Kingfisher Alcedo atthis 2
Common Kestrel Falco tinnunculus 1
Long-tailed Shrike Lanius schach 10
Hair-crested Drongo Dicrurus hottentottus 2
Eurasian/Oriental Skylark Alauda arvensis/gulgula 2
Barn Swallow Hirundo rustica 8
Red-rumped Swallow Cecropis daurica 2
Asian House Martin Delichon dasypus 1
Chinese Penduline Tit Remiz consobrinus 20
Light-vented Bulbul Pycnonotus sinensis 6
Pallas’s Leaf Warbler Phylloscopus proregulus 6
Yellow-browed Warbler P. inornatus 2
Plain Prinia Prinia inornata 1
Vinous-throated Parrotbill Sinosuthora webbiana 30
Crested Myna Acridotheres cristatellus 4
White’s Thrush Zoothera aurea 5
Grey-backed Thrush Turdus hortulorum 1
Japanese Thrush T. cardis 3
Eyebrowed Thrush T. obscurus 1
Pale Thrush T. pallidus 12
Dusky Thrush T. eunomus 8
Naumann’s Thrush T. naumanni 1
Rufous-tailed Robin Larvivora sibilans 1
Red-flanked Bluetail Tarsiger cyanurus 9
Daurian Redstart Phoenicurus auroreus 13
Eurasian Tree Sparrow Passer montanus 50
Eastern Yellow Wagtail Motacilla tschutschensis taivana 1
White Wagtail M. alba 12
Richard’s Pipit Anthus richardi 2
Brambling Fringilla montifringilla 100
Tristram’s Bunting Emberiza tristrami 2
Yellow-throated Bunting E. elegans 6
Yellow-breasted Bunting E. aureola 2
Pallas’s Reed Bunting E. pallasi 3

List 1 of 1 for Wed. 9 Nov. 2016 (69 species)

A rather harried flock of Pied Avocet fly over the defunct wetland at Nanhui, 9 Nov. 2016. The avocets were often interrupting their feeding and resting to make a circular flight before settling back down at more or less the same location.
A rather harried flock of Pied Avocet fly over the defunct wetland at Nanhui, 9 Nov. 2016. The avocets were often interrupting their feeding to make a circular flight before settling back down at more or less the same location. (Craig Brelsford)

Birds noted around Pudong Nanhui Dongtan Wetland (Pǔdōng Nánhuì Dōngtān Shīdì [浦东南汇东滩湿地]; 30.920507, 121.973159), Pudong, Shanghai, China. List includes birds found at Dishui Lake (30.908702, 121.945124). We covered the entire coastal road from Luchao (Lúcháo Gǎng [芦潮港]; 30.851109, 121.848455) to Binhai (Bīnhǎi Zhèn [滨海镇]; 31.006250, 121.885558). Among the points along this 30 km stretch of coast are the Iron Track (31.003613, 121.907883), Big Bend (31.000321, 121.938074), Microforest 4 (30.953225, 121.959083), Microforest 1 (30.923889, 121.971635), the Magic Parking Lot (30.884898, 121.968229), the Magic GPS Point (30.880563, 121.964551), South Lock (30.860073, 121.909997), the Eiffel Tower (30.850531, 121.878047), & the Marshy Agricultural Land (30.850707, 121.863662). Cloudy & breezy. Low 11° C, high 13° C. Humidity 69%. Visibility: 10 km. Wind NNW 15 km/h. PM2.5 AQI: 55 (moderate). Sunrise 06:17, sunset 16:58. WED 09 NOV 2016 06:30-17:20. Craig Brelsford, Elaine Du, & Erica Locke.

Tundra Swan Cygnus columbianus bewickii 11
Gadwall Anas strepera 12
Falcated Duck A. falcata 300
Eurasian Wigeon A. penelope 290
Mallard A. platyrhynchos 40
Eastern Spot-billed Duck A. zonorhyncha ca. 500
Northern Shoveler A. clypeata 30
Northern Pintail A. acuta 120
Eurasian Teal A. crecca 140
Common Pochard Aythya ferina 15
Tufted Duck A. fuligula 250
Greater Scaup A. marila 4
Smew Mergellus albellus 2
Common Pheasant Phasianus colchicus 2
Little Grebe Tachybaptus ruficollis 50
Great Crested Grebe Podiceps cristatus 12
Great Cormorant Eurasian Phalacrocorax carbo 200
Grey Heron Ardea cinerea 60
Great Egret A. alba 20
Little Egret Egretta garzetta 260
Black-crowned Night Heron Nycticorax nycticorax 12
Eurasian Spoonbill Platalea leucorodia 14
Black-faced Spoonbill P. minor 8
Eurasian/Black-faced Spoonbill P. leucorodia/minor 48 distant, bills tucked in
Eastern Buzzard Buteo japonicus 1
Common Moorhen Gallinula chloropus 7
Eurasian Coot Fulica atra 30
Pied Avocet Recurvirostra avosetta 35
Grey Plover Pluvialis squatarola 20
Kentish Plover Charadrius alexandrinus 40
Black-tailed Godwit Limosa limosa 1
Great Knot Calidris tenuirostris 2
Red-necked Stint C. ruficollis 3
Dunlin C. alpina 60
Common Snipe Gallinago gallinago 3
Spotted Redshank Tringa erythropus 250
Common Greenshank T. nebularia 80
Marsh Sandpiper T. stagnatilis 25
Saunders’s Gull Chroicocephalus saundersi 12
Black-headed Gull C. ridibundus 300
Vega Gull Vega Larus vegae vegae/L. v. mongolicus 6
Caspian Tern Hydroprogne caspia 2
Feral Pigeon (Rock Dove) Columba livia 2
Oriental Turtle Dove Streptopelia orientalis 12
Spotted Dove S. chinensis 9
Common Kingfisher Alcedo atthis 1
Common Kestrel Falco tinnunculus 2
Peregrine Falcon F. peregrinus 1
Long-tailed Shrike Lanius schach 13
Eurasian/Oriental Skylark Alauda arvensis/gulgula 6
Chinese Penduline Tit Remiz consobrinus 20
Light-vented Bulbul Pycnonotus sinensis 5
Pallas’s Leaf Warbler Phylloscopus proregulus 4
Plain Prinia Prinia inornata 3
Vinous-throated Parrotbill Sinosuthora webbiana 15
Crested Myna Acridotheres cristatellus 6
White’s Thrush Zoothera aurea 4
Pale Thrush Turdus pallidus 12
Dusky Thrush T. eunomus 8
Red-flanked Bluetail Tarsiger cyanurus 16
Daurian Redstart Phoenicurus auroreus 18
Stejneger’s Stonechat Saxicola stejnegeri 1
Eurasian Tree Sparrow Passer montanus ca. 100
White Wagtail Motacilla alba 24
Brambling Fringilla montifringilla 18
Tristram’s Bunting Emberiza tristrami 1
Chestnut-eared Bunting E. fucata 2
Yellow-throated Bunting E. elegans 9
Yellow-breasted Bunting E. aureola 3
Pallas’s Reed Bunting E. pallasi 2

Featured image: Reed Parrotbill, a Chinese near-endemic, a species under threat, a bird of personality and beauty, and a symbol of Shanghai and the Chinese coast. Far left: Yangkou, Rudong, Jiangsu, 8 May 2010. Middle, top: Yangkou, 10 October 2010. Middle, bottom and far right: Nanhui, 18 May 2016. All by Craig Brelsford.