Messengers

Editor’s note: In recent weeks, Shanghai has had extraordinary visits by three species of crane. Since 12 Nov. 2016, 3 Siberian Crane, a Critically Endangered species, have been recorded regularly in a reclaimed area of Hengsha Island (photo above, left). On 10 Dec. 2016, Endangered Red-crowned Crane made the first recorded visit by that species to Cape Nanhui (top right). Also since 12 Nov. 2016, Vulnerable Hooded Crane has been recorded regularly at Cape Nanhui (bottom right). Before 12 Nov., Hooded Crane had never been recorded on the Shanghai Peninsula. Photos by Craig Brelsford.

The appearance on 10 Dec. 2016 of 2 Red-crowned Crane at Pudong’s Cape Nanhui was more than just a historic, first-ever sighting. It was a message. The endangered cranes, as well as the Siberian Crane on Hengsha Island and Hooded Crane at Cape Nanhui, are telling us that habitat is steadily disappearing elsewhere along the Chinese coast, particularly in Jiangsu; that the habitats in Shanghai are some of the best that remain; and that those habitats require world-class protection. The most pressing need is the creation of a world-class, small to mid-sized wetland reserve at Cape Nanhui.

Siberian Crane, Hengsha, 7 Dec. 2016. Craig Brelsford.
Siberian Crane in flight. Hengsha Island, 7 Dec. 2016. Craig Brelsford.

Errant cranes migrating along the Chinese coast may once have settled for a while somewhere in Jiangsu. Every year, however, cranes migrating along the coast of that densely populated province find fewer and fewer places suitable to them. My wife Elaine Du and I have surveyed the Jiangsu coastline from Qidong on the Yangtze River 250 km north to Yancheng National Nature Reserve. We have seen with our own eyes the dramatic transformation of the Jiangsu coast. Even areas in Jiangsu receiving considerable international attention, such as Yangkou and the coastal areas of Dongtai, are under threat.

Cape Nanhui may not seem like a first-rate natural area, but it is in better condition than almost any place I have seen between Qidong and Yancheng. I say, therefore, that the recent crane sightings in Shanghai have come about in large part because elsewhere so much has been lost. The cranes have nowhere else to go.

Shanghai birders search for the Hooded Crane sojourning at Cape Nanhui, 10 Dec. 2016. Craig Brelsford.
Shanghai birders search for the Hooded Crane sojourning at Cape Nanhui, 10 Dec. 2016. The new city of Lingang, which did not exist 10 years ago, looms in the background. Craig Brelsford.

And that is why conserving Cape Nanhui is so important. Shanghai is facing a crisis, a “danger-opportunity” (危机). The 危 or danger is that amid the wholesale destruction of so much coastal habitat elsewhere, Shanghai will follow suit and destroy its remaining good habitat. The 机 or opportunity is for Shanghai to gather into its bosom the birds ejected from Jiangsu–to be not only the economic but also the conservationist leader on the Chinese coast. The creation at Cape Nanhui of an easily accessible, world-class, small to mid-sized wetland reserve along the lines of Sungei Buloh in Singapore would be a way of avoiding the 危 and seizing the 机.

The case for an easily accessible wetland reserve at Cape Nanhui could scarcely be more clear-cut:

(1) Cape Nanhui is of extraordinary environmental importance. The tip of the Shanghai Peninsula between the Yangtze River and Hangzhou Bay, Cape Nanhui is a stepping stone for birds migrating across those bodies of water. Cape Nanhui also holds large reed beds, habitat critical to Reed Parrotbill and other species at risk.

The largest component of the city-province of Shanghai is the Shanghai Peninsula, a projection of land between the Yangtze River and Hangzhou Bay. Cape Nanhui is the tip of the peninsula, is a critically important stop for migrating birds, and is completely unprotected. A nature reserve at Cape Nanhui would form a third ‘stepping stone’ for birds crossing the Yangtze Delta, joining the reserves at Chongming Dongtan and Jiuduansha. Photo by NASA, customized by Craig Brelsford.
Cape Nanhui is the tip of the Shanghai Peninsula, a headland between the mouth of the Yangtze River and Hangzhou Bay. As the satellite image above illustrates, a nature reserve at Cape Nanhui would form a ‘stepping stone’ for birds crossing the Yangtze Delta, joining the reserves at Chongming Dongtan and Jiuduansha as well as the largely undeveloped reclaimed land on Hengsha. (Newly reclaimed land on Hengsha not shown in this 2005 image.) Photo by NASA, customized by Craig Brelsford.

The 2 Red-crowned Crane this past Saturday were the latest in a parade of endangered birds that I and other birders have noted at the Cape over the years. Critically Endangered Spoon-billed Sandpiper uses Cape Nanhui, as does Endangered Nordmann’s Greenshank. Around 2 percent of the world’s Endangered Black-faced Spoonbill are dependent on Cape Nanhui for several months each year. Large reed beds remain at Cape Nanhui and are the final strongholds on the Shanghai Peninsula of Near Threatened Marsh Grassbird and Near Threatened Reed Parrotbill. The latter species, a candidate for Shanghai Provincial Bird, will virtually disappear from mainland Shanghai if the reed beds at Nanhui are destroyed.

(2) Shanghai is clearly under-performing on the conservationist front. More must be done, and a good place to begin is Cape Nanhui.

Hen Harrier (top) and Eastern Marsh Harrier, Cape Nanhui, 10 Dec. 2016. These photos show both the threats to the tip of the Shanghai Peninsula and the environmental opportunities still there. On the one hand, buildings and roads continue to encroach on the reed beds; the large farm building in the bottom photo was completed only in the past year. Further encroachments will erode the quality still further and deprive species such as Reed Parrotbill of even more habitat. On the other hand, habitat good enough to attract harriers remains. In the bottom photo, the harrier is flying directly over the reed bed (<a href="https://www.google.com/maps/place/30%C2%B055'46.2%22N+121%C2%B057'37.1%22E/@30.929492,121.9581253,872m/data=!3m2!1e3!4b1!4m5!3m4!1s0x0:0x0!8m2!3d30.929492!4d121.960314" target="_blank">30.929492, 121.960314</a>) adjacent to the defunct wetland reserve. This reed bed covers a square kilometer, is untouched, and provides habitat critical to species dependent on reeds, such as Near Threatened <a href="http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/22715480/0" target="_blank">Marsh Grassbird</a> and <a href="http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/22721016/0" target="_blank">Japanese Reed Bunting</a>. In the top photo, the untouched reed bed is visible in the mid-ground, with the harrier making use of adjacent rice fields. Even small reserves can be effective, especially if bordered by agricultural areas. If managed correctly, a small to mid-sized reserve at Cape Nanhui would cost little, deliver much, and give environmental face to Shanghai. Photos by Craig Brelsford.
Hen Harrier (top) and Eastern Marsh Harrier, Cape Nanhui, 10 Dec. 2016. These photos show both the threats to the tip of the Shanghai Peninsula and the environmental opportunities still there. On the one hand, buildings and roads continue to encroach on the reed beds; the large farm building in the bottom photo was completed only in the past year. Further encroachments will erode the quality still further and deprive species such as Reed Parrotbill of even more habitat. On the other hand, habitat good enough to attract harriers remains. In the bottom photo, the harrier is flying directly over the reed bed (30.929492, 121.960314) adjacent to the defunct wetland reserve. This reed bed covers a square kilometer, is untouched, and provides habitat critical to species dependent on reeds, such as Near Threatened Marsh Grassbird and Japanese Reed Bunting. In the top photo, the untouched reed bed is visible in the mid-ground, with the harrier making use of adjacent rice fields. Even small reserves can be effective, especially if bordered by agricultural areas. If managed correctly, a small to mid-sized reserve at Cape Nanhui would cost little, deliver much, and give environmental face to Shanghai. Photos by Craig Brelsford.

Nature reserves have been established only on the extreme fringes of the city-province (which is a third the size of Wales). There are no reserves in mainland Pudong, a giant coastal district nearly twice the size of Singapore. Nowhere in this megalopolis can residents without a car enjoy the natural side of Shanghai, a city with an extraordinarily rich natural heritage. There is no known plan to conserve any of the dozens of square kilometers of reclaimed land on Hengsha.

(3) Because it is in the back yard of Shanghai, a city-province of more than 25 million people, a well-run, easily accessible wetland reserve at Cape Nanhui could be the match to light the fire of conservation across all China.

Shanghai birders in defunct wetland reserve, Nanhui, 10 Dec. 2016. As China becomes a middle-income country, Chinese people will find themselves with more and more disposable income and leisure time. This is especially the case in Shanghai, whose living standards are rapidly approaching those of advanced Western countries. Middle-class Chinese will increasingly demand places for rest, relaxation, and nature appreciation. Shanghai currently has such places, and one of them is Cape Nanhui. The tip of the Shanghai Peninsula already has beautiful reed beds and amazing migratory birds, the inheritance of natural Shanghai. With proper management, Shanghai could preserve and showcase those wonders, giving future generations of Shanghainese a gift that will never stop giving. L-R: Zhāng Huá (张华), Zhāng Xuěhán (张雪寒), Lán Bāngxiàn (蓝邦宪), Lán Xī (兰溪), Craig Brelsford, Cài Jiàndōng (蔡见东), Zhāng Xiǎoyàn (张小艳), Hǎo Zhàokuān (郝兆宽), Chéng Yīxuān (程一轩), Xú Yáng (徐扬). Photo by Elaine Du.
Shanghai birders in defunct wetland reserve, Nanhui, 10 Dec. 2016. The people you see in this picture are the Johnny Appleseeds of birding and nature appreciation in China. Though still few in number, people such as they are laying the foundation for a future in which more Chinese cherish the natural environment. In Shanghai living standards have attained those of Western countries. Shanghainese such as these birders now possess disposable income and leisure time. Increasingly, these middle-class people will demand places for rest, relaxation, and nature appreciation. Shanghai, a city-province half as large as Northern Ireland, currently has such places, and the most easily accessible of them is Cape Nanhui. In the face of unremitting development, and despite being under no environmental protection, the tip of the Shanghai Peninsula still holds considerable reed beds and attracts many endangered migratory birds. With proper management, Shanghai could preserve and showcase the wonders of Cape Nanhui, giving future generations of Shanghainese a gift that will never stop giving. L-R: Zhāng Huá (张华), Zhāng Xuěhán (张雪寒), Lán Bāngxiàn (蓝邦宪), Lán Xī (兰溪), Craig Brelsford, Cài Jiàndōng (蔡见东), Zhāng Xiǎoyàn (张小艳), Hǎo Zhàokuān (郝兆宽), Chéng Yīxuān (程一轩), Xú Yáng (徐扬). Photo by Elaine Du.

Hundreds of thousands of children could visit the reserve with their parents using nothing more than the Metro and a quick taxi ride and be sleeping in their own bed that night, dreaming about the wild birds they had seen that day. For millions of parents and their kids, the weekend could be “Saturday, Disney; Sunday, Cape Nanhui Wetland.” A day at a Cape Nanhui Wetland would be an early introduction to the glories of natural Shanghai and would foster an appreciation of the natural world.

If Shanghai can be a world economic center and have world-class airports and a world-class skyline and world-class entertainment such as Disney, then it can and must have world-class preservation of its priceless coastline and migratory birds.

I repeat: The case for a world-class, easily accessible wetland reserve at Cape Nanhui is clear-cut.

111 SPECIES AT CORE SHANGHAI SITES

Shanghai birders at Nanhui, 10 Dec. 2016. Photo by Hǎo Zhàokuān (郝兆宽).
Shanghai birders at Nanhui. On 10 Dec. 2016, this international team attained the first-ever record of Red-crowned Crane on the Shanghai Peninsula. Standing, L-R: Andy Lee, Xú Yáng (徐扬), Xú Fènqiáng (徐奋强), Cài Jiàndōng (蔡见东), Michael Grunwell, Russell Boyman, & Lán Bāngxiàn (蓝邦宪). Bottom row: Zhāng Xuěhán (张雪寒), Zhāng Xiǎoyàn (张小艳), Zhāng Huá (张华), Lán Xī (兰溪), Chéng Yīxuān (程一轩), Craig Brelsford, Elaine Du, Mrs. Hao, & Hǎo Lèzhī (郝乐之). Photo by Hǎo Zhàokuān (郝兆宽).

Elaine and I birded four of the eight days between 3 Dec. and 10 Dec. 2016, noting 111 species. We birded three days at Cape Nanhui, half a day on Hengsha Island, and half a day at Binjiang Forest Park in Pudong. On 10 Dec. Elaine and I led a group of members of the Shanghai Birding WeChat group on a tour of Nanhui. We birded the other days with Shanghai-based U.K. birder Michael Grunwell and U.S. birder Susan Lessner.

Major highlights were 2 Red-crowned Crane and Hooded Crane at Cape Nanhui and 3 Siberian Crane on Hengsha as well as Baikal Teal and Red-breasted Flycatcher at Nanhui and Ferruginous Duck on Hengsha.

Red-breasted Flycatcher, Nanhui, 6 Dec. 2016. Craig Brelsford.
Red-breasted Flycatcher, Nanhui, 6 Dec. 2016. Rare Shanghai record. Note pinkish bill. Craig Brelsford.

Nanhui also gave us three-day counts of 20 Vulnerable Swan Goose, 14 Greater White-fronted Goose, 190 Tundra Swan (bewickii), 255 Common Shelduck, 11 Greater Scaup, 4 Black-necked Grebe, Brown Crake, Vulnerable Saunders’s Gull, 2 Mew Gull Larus canus, 2 Lesser Black-backed Gull (heuglini), late Eurasian Wryneck, uncommon winter visitor Dusky Warbler, 22 Near Threatened Reed Parrotbill, and 2 extralimital Common Starling.

We noted shorebird stragglers at Nanhui, among them Near Threatened Eurasian Curlew (2), Bar-tailed Godwit (1), and Red Knot (3). We recorded just 2 Endangered Black-faced Spoonbill, and we found 3 Black-collared Starling near Pudong Airport.

Hen Harrier with Peregrine Falcon, Hengsha, 6 Dec. 2016. Craig Brelsford.
Hen Harrier with Peregrine Falcon, Hengsha, 7 Dec. 2016. Craig Brelsford.

Hengsha gave us a rare Shanghai sighting of adult-male Hen Harrier as well as 3 Chinese Grey Shrike and impressive numbers of buntings. In a single stretch of scrub just 500 m long, we counted 14 Little Bunting, 18 Rustic Bunting, 17 Yellow-throated Bunting, 4 Black-faced Bunting, and 150 Pallas’s Reed Bunting.

Binjiang Forest Park once again proved to be one of the only places in urban Shanghai where Great Spotted Woodpecker is reliable. Thrushes were numerous, with Naumann’s Thrush leading the list.

The Day Lists
Lists are generated on eBird then adjusted to comport with my first reference, the IOC World Bird List.

List 1 of 1 for Sat. 3 Dec. 2016 (69 species)

Dusky Thrush, 3 Dec. 2016, Nanhui. Photo by Craig Brelsford.
Dusky Thrush, 3 Dec. 2016, Nanhui. Photo by Craig Brelsford.

Birds noted around Pudong Nanhui Dongtan Wetland (Pǔdōng Nánhuì Dōngtān Shīdì [浦东南汇东滩湿地]; 30.920507, 121.973159), Pudong, Shanghai, China. We covered the coastal road from Binhai (Bīnhǎi Zhèn [滨海镇]; 31.006250, 121.885558) to Luchao (Lúcháo Gǎng [芦潮港]; 30.851109, 121.848455). Among the points along this 30 km stretch are Iron Track (31.003613, 121.907883), a site providing access to the reed beds at the mouth of the Dazhi River (Dàzhì Hé [大治河]); Big Bend (31.000321, 121.938074); Microforest 4 (30.953225, 121.959083); Microforest 1 (30.923889, 121.971635); Magic Parking Lot (30.884898, 121.968229); Magic GPS Point (30.880563, 121.964551); South Lock (30.860073, 121.909997); Eiffel Tower (30.850531, 121.878047); & the Marshy Agricultural Land (30.850707, 121.863662). List includes birds noted at Dishui Lake (30.908702, 121.945124). Sunny. Low 8° C, high 14° C. Humidity 67%. Visibility: 10 km. Wind SE 6 km/h. PM2.5 AQI: 74 (moderate). Sunrise 06:38, sunset 16:51. SAT 03 DEC 2016 07:15-16:50. Craig Brelsford, Elaine Du, & Michael Grunwell.

Swan Goose Anser cygnoides 10
Tundra Bean Goose A. serrirostris 53
Greater White-fronted Goose A. albifrons 2
Tundra Swan Cygnus columbianus bewickii 128
Common Shelduck Tadorna tadorna 155
Gadwall Anas strepera 7
Falcated Duck A. falcata 600
Eurasian Wigeon A. penelope 20
Mallard A. platyrhynchos 150
Eastern Spot-billed Duck A. zonorhyncha 320
Northern Shoveler A. clypeata 20
Northern Pintail A. acuta 10
Eurasian Teal A. crecca 15
Common Pochard Aythya ferina 40
Tufted Duck A. fuligula 47
Common Pheasant Phasianus colchicus 5
Little Grebe Tachybaptus ruficollis 40
Great Crested Grebe Podiceps cristatus 20
Great Cormorant Phalacrocorax carbo 80
Grey Heron Ardea cinerea 70
Great Egret A. alba 23
Little Egret Egretta garzetta 160
Chinese Pond Heron Ardeola bacchus 5
Black-crowned Night Heron Nycticorax nycticorax 10
Eurasian Spoonbill Platalea leucorodia 53
Black-faced Spoonbill P. minor 2
Western Osprey Pandion haliaetus 1
Hen Harrier Circus cyaneus 1
Eastern Buzzard Buteo japonicus 4
Common Moorhen Gallinula chloropus 4
Eurasian Coot Fulica atra 200
Hooded Crane Grus monacha 1
Pied Avocet Recurvirostra avosetta 11
Grey Plover Pluvialis squatarola 80
Northern Lapwing Vanellus vanellus 100
Kentish Plover Charadrius alexandrinus 10
Bar-tailed Godwit Limosa lapponica 1
Red Knot Calidris canutus 3
Dunlin C. alpina 30
Common Snipe Gallinago gallinago 30
Common Sandpiper Actitis hypoleucos 1
Spotted Redshank Tringa erythropus 110
Black-headed Gull Chroicocephalus ridibundus 1
Oriental Turtle Dove Streptopelia orientalis 1
Spotted Dove S. chinensis 2
Eurasian Hoopoe Upupa epops 1
Peregrine Falcon Falco peregrinus 1
Long-tailed Shrike Lanius schach 35
Chinese Penduline Tit Remiz consobrinus 70
Light-vented Bulbul Pycnonotus sinensis 20
Yellow-browed Warbler Phylloscopus inornatus 1
Zitting Cisticola Cisticola juncidis 2
Plain Prinia Prinia inornata 10
Reed Parrotbill Paradoxornis heudei 14
Vinous-throated Parrotbill Sinosuthora webbiana 30
Crested Myna Acridotheres cristatellus 60
Pale Thrush Turdus pallidus 1
Dusky Thrush T. eunomus 12
Red-flanked Bluetail Tarsiger cyanurus 1
Daurian Redstart Phoenicurus auroreus 12
Eurasian Tree Sparrow Passer montanus 100
Eastern Yellow Wagtail Motacilla tschutschensis taivana 6
White Wagtail M. alba 20
Richard’s Pipit Anthus richardi 6
Buff-bellied Pipit A. rubescens japonicus 30
Grey-capped Greenfinch Chloris sinica 2
Chestnut-eared Bunting Emberiza fucata 12
Black-faced Bunting E. spodocephala 6
Pallas’s Reed Bunting E. pallasi 15

List 1 of 1 for Tues. 6 Dec. 2016 (63 species)

Common Pochard, Nanhui, 6 Dec. 2016. Craig Brelsford.
Common Pochard, a diving duck. Nanhui, 6 Dec. 2016. Craig Brelsford.

Birds noted around Pudong Nanhui Dongtan Wetland (Pǔdōng Nánhuì Dōngtān Shīdì [浦东南汇东滩湿地]; 30.920507, 121.973159), Pudong, Shanghai, China. We covered the coastal road from Binhai (Bīnhǎi Zhèn [滨海镇]; 31.006250, 121.885558) to Luchao (Lúcháo Gǎng [芦潮港]; 30.851109, 121.848455). Among the points along this 30 km stretch are Iron Track (31.003613, 121.907883), a site providing access to the reed beds at the mouth of the Dazhi River (Dàzhì Hé [大治河]); Big Bend (31.000321, 121.938074); Microforest 4 (30.953225, 121.959083); Microforest 1 (30.923889, 121.971635); Magic Parking Lot (30.884898, 121.968229); Magic GPS Point (30.880563, 121.964551); South Lock (30.860073, 121.909997); Eiffel Tower (30.850531, 121.878047); & the Marshy Agricultural Land (30.850707, 121.863662). List includes birds noted at Dishui Lake (30.908702, 121.945124). Sunny. Low 6° C, high 9° C. Humidity 54%. Visibility: 10 km. Wind NE 6 km/h. PM2.5 AQI: 102 (unhealthful). Sunrise 06:40, sunset 16:51. SAT 03 DEC 2016 06:50-17:10. Craig Brelsford, Elaine Du, & Susan Lessner.

Swan Goose Anser cygnoides 10
Tundra Bean Goose A. serrirostris 50
Greater White-fronted Goose A. albifrons 12
Tundra Swan Cygnus columbianus bewickii 62
Common Shelduck Tadorna tadorna 100
Falcated Duck Anas falcata 600
Eurasian Wigeon A. penelope 30
Mallard A. platyrhynchos 260
Eastern Spot-billed Duck A. zonorhyncha 350
Northern Shoveler A. clypeata 100
Northern Pintail A. acuta 120
Baikal Teal A. formosa 5
Eurasian Teal A. crecca 210
Common Pochard Aythya ferina 2
Tufted Duck A. fuligula 110
Greater Scaup A. marila 11
Common Pheasant Phasianus colchicus 1
Little Grebe Tachybaptus ruficollis 20
Great Crested Grebe Podiceps cristatus 20
Black-necked Grebe P. nigricollis 4
Great Cormorant Phalacrocorax carbo 100
Grey Heron Ardea cinerea 80
Great Egret A. alba 20
Little Egret Egretta garzetta 200
Black-crowned Night Heron Nycticorax nycticorax 6
Eurasian Spoonbill Platalea leucorodia 28
Western Osprey Pandion haliaetus 3
Eastern Buzzard Buteo japonicus 2
Eurasian Coot Fulica atra 400
Hooded Crane Grus monacha 1
Grey Plover Pluvialis squatarola 120
Northern Lapwing Vanellus vanellus 100
Kentish Plover Charadrius alexandrinus 30
Eurasian Curlew Numenius arquata 2
Dunlin Calidris alpina 500
Common Snipe Gallinago gallinago 12
Common Greenshank Tringa nebularia 25
Vega Gull Larus vegae vegae/L. v. mongolicus 3
Spotted Dove Streptopelia chinensis 7
Eurasian Wryneck Jynx torquilla 1
Common Kestrel Falco tinnunculus 2
Peregrine Falcon F. peregrinus 1
Long-tailed Shrike Lanius schach 30
Eurasian/Oriental Skylark Alauda arvensis/gulgula 4
Chinese Penduline Tit Remiz consobrinus 40
Light-vented Bulbul Pycnonotus sinensis 15
Yellow-browed Warbler Phylloscopus inornatus 2
Plain Prinia Prinia inornata 1
Reed Parrotbill Paradoxornis heudei 8
Vinous-throated Parrotbill Sinosuthora webbiana 20
Crested Myna Acridotheres cristatellus 30
Pale Thrush Turdus pallidus 3
Dusky Thrush T. eunomus 2
Red-flanked Bluetail Tarsiger cyanurus 3
Red-breasted Flycatcher Ficedula parva 1
Daurian Redstart Phoenicurus auroreus 8
Eurasian Tree Sparrow Passer montanus 100
Eastern Yellow Wagtail Motacilla tschutschensis taivana 2
White Wagtail M. alba 40
Buff-bellied Pipit Anthus rubescens japonicus 30
Chestnut-eared Bunting Emberiza fucata 12
Black-faced Bunting E. spodocephala 3
Pallas’s Reed Bunting E. pallasi 1

List 1 of 2 for Wed. 7 Dec. 2016 (48 species)

Zitting Cisticola, Hengsha Island, 7 Dec. 2016. Photo by Craig Brelsford.
Zitting Cisticola, a drop of color in the drab scrub. Hengsha Island, 7 Dec. 2016. Photo by Craig Brelsford.

Birds noted on Hengsha Island (Héngshā Dǎo [横沙岛]), small alluvial island at mouth of Yangtze River in Shanghai, China. S gate to reclaimed area at 31.298821, 121.854439. Mostly sunny, hazy. Low 3° C, high 15° C. Humidity 47%. Visibility: 10 km. Wind WNW 6 km/h. PM2.5 AQI: 187 (unhealthful). Sunrise 06:41, sunset 16:51. WED 07 DEC 2016 06:20-12:40. Craig Brelsford, Elaine Du, & Susan Lessner.

Gadwall Anas strepera 270
Falcated Duck A. falcata 30
Eurasian Wigeon A. penelope 2
Eastern Spot-billed Duck A. zonorhyncha 50
Northern Shoveler A. clypeata 15
Northern Pintail A. acuta 20
Eurasian Teal A. crecca 100
Common Pochard Aythya ferina 8
Ferruginous Duck A. nyroca 2
Tufted Duck A. fuligula 1
Little Grebe Tachybaptus ruficollis 8
Great Crested Grebe Podiceps cristatus 5
Eurasian Bittern Botaurus stellaris 2
Grey Heron Ardea cinerea 15
Great Egret A. alba 6
Little Egret Egretta garzetta 25
Eastern Cattle Egret Bubulcus coromandus 1
Chinese Pond Heron Ardeola bacchus 1
Hen Harrier Circus cyaneus 2
Circus sp. 3
Eastern Buzzard Buteo japonicus 2
Common Moorhen Gallinula chloropus 15
Eurasian Coot Fulica atra 80
Siberian Crane Grus leucogeranus 3
Northern Lapwing Vanellus vanellus 20
Common Snipe Gallinago gallinago 1
Spotted Redshank Tringa erythropus 18
Common Kingfisher Alcedo atthis 1
Common Kestrel Falco tinnunculus 3
Peregrine Falcon F. peregrinus 2
Long-tailed Shrike Lanius schach 14
Chinese Grey Shrike L. sphenocercus sphenocercus 3
Eurasian/Oriental Skylark Alauda arvensis/gulgula 8
Chinese Penduline Tit Remiz consobrinus 20
Light-vented Bulbul Pycnonotus sinensis 5
Zitting Cisticola Cisticola juncidis 5
Plain Prinia Prinia inornata 2
Crested Myna Acridotheres cristatellus 6
Chinese Blackbird Turdus mandarinus 1
Dusky Thrush T. eunomus 4
Daurian Redstart Phoenicurus auroreus 6
Eurasian Tree Sparrow Passer montanus 50
White Wagtail Motacilla alba 20
Richard’s Pipit Anthus richardi 6
Buff-bellied Pipit A. rubescens japonicus 22
Little Bunting Emberiza pusilla 14
Rustic Bunting E. rustica 18
Yellow-throated Bunting E. elegans 17
Black-faced Bunting E. spodocephala 4
Pallas’s Reed Bunting E. pallasi 150

List 2 of 2 for Wed. 7 Dec. 2016 (22 species)

Collared Finchbill, Binjiang Forest Park, Pudong, 7 Dec. 2016. Digiscoped image by Elaine Du.
Collared Finchbill, parking lot of Binjiang Forest Park, Pudong, 7 Dec. 2016. Feral or natural? The jury’s still out on Binjiang’s Collared Finchbill, a mainly south Chinese species. Digiscoped image by Elaine Du.

Birds noted at Binjiang Forest Park, Pudong New Area (Pǔdōng Xīn Qū [浦东新区]), Shanghai, China (31.383916, 121.523818). Mostly sunny, hazy. Low 3° C, high 15° C. Humidity 47%. Visibility: 10 km. Wind WNW 6 km/h. PM2.5 AQI: 187 (unhealthful). Sunrise 06:41, sunset 16:51. WED 07 DEC 2016 14:45-16:45. Craig Brelsford, Elaine Du, & Susan Lessner.

Black-crowned Night Heron Nycticorax nycticorax 1
Vega Gull Larus vegae vegae/L. v. mongolicus 1
Oriental Turtle Dove Streptopelia orientalis 5
Spotted Dove S. chinensis 9
Eurasian Hoopoe Upupa epops 3
Great Spotted Woodpecker Dendrocopos major 2
Long-tailed Shrike Lanius schach 2
Azure-winged Magpie Cyanopica cyanus 3
Japanese Tit Parus minor 5
Collared Finchbill Spizixos semitorques 5
Light-vented Bulbul Pycnonotus sinensis 50
Chinese Hwamei Garrulax canorus 5
White’s Thrush Zoothera aurea 3
Grey-backed Thrush Turdus hortulorum 1
Chinese Blackbird T. mandarinus 32
Pale Thrush T. pallidus 14
Dusky Thrush T. eunomus 16
Naumann’s Thrush T. naumanni 1
Red-flanked Bluetail Tarsiger cyanurus 2
Daurian Redstart Phoenicurus auroreus 3
White Wagtail Motacilla alba 3
Brambling Fringilla montifringilla 29

List 1 of 1 for Sat. 10 Dec. 2016 (76 species)

Shanghai birders viewing Baikal Teal. 10 Dec. 2016. Craig Brelsford.
Shanghai birders viewing Baikal Teal at Cape Nanhui, 10 Dec. 2016. Photo by Craig Brelsford.

Birds noted around Pudong Nanhui Dongtan Wetland (Pǔdōng Nánhuì Dōngtān Shīdì [浦东南汇东滩湿地]; 30.920507, 121.973159), Pudong, Shanghai, China. We covered the coastal road from Binhai (Bīnhǎi Zhèn [滨海镇]; 31.006250, 121.885558) to Luchao (Lúcháo Gǎng [芦潮港]; 30.851109, 121.848455). Among the points along this 30 km stretch are Iron Track (31.003613, 121.907883), a site providing access to the reed beds at the mouth of the Dazhi River (Dàzhì Hé [大治河]); Big Bend (31.000321, 121.938074); Microforest 4 (30.953225, 121.959083); Microforest 1 (30.923889, 121.971635); Magic Parking Lot (30.884898, 121.968229); Magic GPS Point (30.880563, 121.964551); South Lock (30.860073, 121.909997); Eiffel Tower (30.850531, 121.878047); & the Marshy Agricultural Land (30.850707, 121.863662). List includes birds noted at Dishui Lake (30.908702, 121.945124). Mostly cloudy. Low 8° C, high 12° C. Humidity 59%. Visibility: 10 km. Wind ENE 15 km/h. PM2.5 AQI: 70 (moderate). Sunrise 06:43, sunset 16:52. SAT 10 DEC 2016 07:10-15:00. Russell Boyman, Craig Brelsford, Cài Jiàndōng (蔡见东), Chéng Yīxuān (程一轩), Elaine Du, Michael Grunwell, Hǎo Lèzhī (郝乐之), Mrs. Hao, Hǎo Zhàokuān (郝兆宽), Lán Bāngxiàn (蓝邦宪), Lán Xī (兰溪), Andy Lee, Xú Fènqiáng (徐奋强), Xú Yáng (徐扬), Zhāng Huá (张华), Zhāng Xiǎoyàn (张小艳), Zhāng Xuěhán (张雪寒).

Tundra Bean Goose Anser serrirostris 28
Greater White-fronted Goose A. albifrons 1
Tundra Swan Cygnus columbianus bewickii 24
Common Shelduck Tadorna tadorna 12
Falcated Duck Anas falcata 400
Eurasian Wigeon A. penelope 20
Mallard A. platyrhynchos 100
Eastern Spot-billed Duck A. zonorhyncha 100
Northern Shoveler A. clypeata 50
Northern Pintail A. acuta 80
Baikal Teal A. formosa 4
Eurasian Teal A. crecca 50
Common Pochard Aythya ferina 20
Tufted Duck A. fuligula 60
Common Pheasant Phasianus colchicus 1
Little Grebe Tachybaptus ruficollis 32
Great Crested Grebe Podiceps cristatus 25
Great Cormorant Phalacrocorax carbo 60
Eurasian Bittern Botaurus stellaris 2
Grey Heron Ardea cinerea 60
Great Egret A. alba 15
Little Egret Egretta garzetta 60
Black-crowned Night Heron Nycticorax nycticorax 15
Eurasian Spoonbill Platalea leucorodia 100
Western Osprey Pandion haliaetus 3
Eastern Marsh Harrier Circus spilonotus 4
Hen Harrier Circus cyaneus 2
Eastern Buzzard Buteo japonicus 3
White-breasted Waterhen Amaurornis phoenicurus 1
Brown Crake A. akool 1
Common Moorhen Gallinula chloropus 5
Eurasian Coot Fulica atra 220
Hooded Crane Grus monacha 1
Red-crowned Crane G. japonensis 2
Kentish Plover Charadrius alexandrinus 20
Eurasian/Far Eastern Curlew Numenius arquata/madagascariensis 1
Dunlin Calidris alpina 170
Common Snipe Gallinago gallinago 6
Common Sandpiper Actitis hypoleucos 3
Spotted Redshank Tringa erythropus 30
Saunders’s Gull Chroicocephalus saundersi 1
Black-headed Gull C. ridibundus 2
Black-tailed Gull Larus crassirostris 2
Mew Gull L. canus 2
Vega Gull L. vegae vegae/L. v. mongolicus 15
Lesser Black-backed Gull L. fuscus heuglini 2
Feral Pigeon (Rock Dove) Columba livia 1
Oriental Turtle Dove Streptopelia orientalis 1
Spotted Dove S. chinensis 2
Common Kingfisher Alcedo atthis 1
Common Kestrel Falco tinnunculus 1
Peregrine Falcon F. peregrinus 2
Long-tailed Shrike Lanius schach 20
Eurasian/Oriental Skylark Alauda arvensis/gulgula 5 singing
Chinese Penduline Tit Remiz consobrinus 50
Light-vented Bulbul Pycnonotus sinensis 5
Dusky Warbler Phylloscopus fuscatus 1
Plain Prinia Prinia inornata 4
Reed Parrotbill Paradoxornis heudei 4
Vinous-throated Parrotbill Sinosuthora webbiana 15
Common Starling Sturnus vulgaris 2
Black-collared Starling Gracupica nigricollis 3
White-cheeked Starling Spodiopsar cineraceus 4
Crested Myna Acridotheres cristatellus 30
Pale Thrush Turdus pallidus 4
Dusky Thrush T. eunomus 4
Red-flanked Bluetail Tarsiger cyanurus 1
Red-breasted Flycatcher Ficedula parva 1
Daurian Redstart Phoenicurus auroreus 10
Eastern Yellow Wagtail Motacilla tschutschensis taivana 1
White Wagtail M. alba 12
Richard’s Pipit Anthus richardi 2
Buff-bellied Pipit A. rubescens japonicus 10
Chestnut-eared Bunting Emberiza fucata 8
Black-faced Bunting E. spodocephala 2
Pallas’s Reed Bunting E. pallasi 5

The Case for Conserving Nanhui

Editor’s note: Do you like the view above? Reed beds indeed have a special allure. This tranquil scene is from Iron Track (31.003613, 121.907883), home of Reed Parrotbill and dozens of other species, and part of the large reed beds on the Dazhi River at Cape Nanhui. In the face of manic development, and in spite of being under no protection, Cape Nanhui conserves the best reed beds on the Shanghai Peninsula as well as mudflats critical to tens of thousands of migrating shorebirds. To save these treasures, Shanghai people must act now.

Who will save Cape Nanhui? Not foreigners like me, but the people of Shanghai. We foreigners are numerous in Shanghai and are disproportionately represented among the birders here. We can offer valuable perspectives. But if the people of Shanghai themselves do not wish to ensure a bright natural future for Cape Nanhui, then there is little that anyone can do.

I happen to think that the people of Shanghai are ready for real conservation on the Shanghai mainland. Basic conservationist ideas have broad appeal, and an easily accessible, world-class, “people’s wetland reserve” at Cape Nanhui is a basic conservationist idea.

If I were Chinese and were arguing for a people’s wetland reserve for Cape Nanhui, then I would bring to light the following points.

SHANGHAI IS NOT A CITY IN THE CONVENTIONAL SENSE

The largest component of the city-province of Shanghai is the Shanghai Peninsula, a projection of land between the Yangtze River and Hangzhou Bay. Cape Nanhui is the tip of the peninsula, is a critically important stop for migrating birds, and is completely unprotected. A nature reserve at Cape Nanhui would form a third ‘stepping stone’ for birds crossing the Yangtze Delta, joining the reserves at Chongming Dongtan and Jiuduansha. Photo by NASA, customized by Craig Brelsford.
The largest component of the city-province of Shanghai is the Shanghai Peninsula, a projection of land between the Yangtze River and Hangzhou Bay. Cape Nanhui is the tip of the peninsula, is a critically important stop for migrating birds, and is completely unprotected. A nature reserve at Cape Nanhui would form a third ‘stepping stone’ for birds crossing the mouth of the Yangtze, joining the reserves at Chongming Dongtan and Jiuduansha. Photo by NASA, customized by Craig Brelsford.

Shanghai “市” isn’t really a city or a “municipality,” as 市 is often translated. It is a city-province, accountable to no government but the national government. The city-province is vast, covering an area greater than the U.S. states of Delaware and Rhode Island. Shanghai is twice as big as Luxembourg, half as large as Northern Ireland, and a third the size of Wales.

From a conservationist’s perspective, it is important to view Shanghai as a province and not a city, because cities are not usually thought of as being responsible for maintaining large nature reserves within their borders. Provinces, by contrast, are large enough to accommodate nature reserves.

I propose that, where workable, we stop referring to Shanghai as a city or municipality and start applying to it the more accurate label of city-province.

SHANGHAI OCCUPIES LAND UNUSUALLY IMPORTANT TO CONSERVATION

Reed Parrotbill. Far left: Yangkou, Rudong, Jiangsu, May 2010. Upper middle: Yangkou, October 2010. Bottom middle and far right: Nanhui, Shanghai, May 2016.
Reed Parrotbill is a a symbol of Shanghai and candidate for Shanghai Provincial Bird. Nowhere do the people of Shanghai have a better chance of seeing this Near Threatened species than in the reed beds at Cape Nanhui. Protection of the reed beds at Cape Nanhui would send a message to the world that Shanghai takes conservation seriously. Photos by Craig Brelsford.

Any jurisdiction covering an area the size of a small country would be expected to conserve substantial amounts of its area. In the case of Shanghai, the call to conserve is even louder, because the area it occupies is unusually important for conservation. The Shanghai Peninsula is situated between the mouth of Asia’s greatest river and Hangzhou Bay. It is on the East Asian-Australasian Flyway and attracts tens of thousands of passage migrants representing a few hundred species.

Cape Nanhui is the tip of the Shanghai Peninsula and attracts passage migrants and winter visitors such as the Endangered Black-faced Spoonbill. Its large reed beds are the final stronghold on the Shanghai Peninsula of Near Threatened Reed Parrotbill, a candidate for Shanghai Provincial Bird, as well as Near Threatened Marsh Grassbird.

An abandoned sign about Ruddy Turnstone has been turned into a wall by a fisherman for his shack in the defunct nature reserve at Nanhui. 9 Nov. 2016. Photo by Craig Brelsford.
An abandoned sign about Ruddy Turnstone has been turned into a wall by a fisherman for his shack in the defunct nature reserve at Nanhui. Craig Brelsford.

Cape Nanhui is completely unprotected; indeed, an attempt at a small wetland reserve has been shut down. The boardwalks and signs of the defunct reserve are crumbling, and the backhoes are standing by, waiting for the green light to smash what remains.

SHANGHAI, AN ENVIRONMENTAL UNDER-PERFORMER

No one is saying that Shanghai, a city-province of 26 million people, needs to create a Yellowstone. Any reasonable person understands the pressures the huge population of Shanghai puts on its natural resources.

Also, it must be pointed out that in the far-flung areas of the city-province, Shanghai has made an attempt at conservation. Chongming Dongtan preserves the eastern nub of Chongming Island, and Jiuduansha covers intertidal shoals near Pudong Airport.

Marsh Grassbird performing song flight at Nanhui, Shanghai, 10 April 2016.
Marsh Grassbird performing song flight at Cape Nanhui, 10 April 2016. The reed bed over which this grassbird was displaying is the largest at Cape Nanhui. It measures 1.4 sq. km and has its center at 30.876060, 121.945305. This reed bed is one of the last places on the Shanghai Peninsula where the song flight of Marsh Grassbird can be seen. Craig Brelsford.

But Shanghai under-performs overall. Nowhere is the poor conservation performance more evident than in Pudong, the coastal city-within-a-city. Pudong is nearly double the size of Singapore and is half the size of Hong Kong. Yet the district contains zero wetland reserves on its mainland. Both Singapore and Hong Kong manage to hold in reserve significant portions of their territory.

The southeastern tip of Pudong is Cape Nanhui, a place that despite being under no protection still brims with natural treasures. No place on the Shanghai Peninsula has as many reed beds. The projection of land attracts birds making the long journey across Hangzhou Bay and the wide mouth of the Yangtze.

Moreover, Cape Nanhui is easily accessible to common people. It would be the perfect place for a world-class wetland reserve on the model of Sungei Buloh in Singapore and Yeyahu National Wetland Park in Beijing.

MORE INFORMATION

Craig talks to Pudong TV about the opportunities for conservation at Nanhui. Photo by Elaine Du.
On 12 Nov. 2016 I was interviewed by Pudong TV about the opportunities for conservation at Nanhui. Later this month, Pudong TV plans to do a more extensive interview with me. UPDATE, 24 DEC 2016: Video of interview here. Photo by Elaine Du.

Later this month I will be doing an interview with Pudong TV about saving Cape Nanhui. I will let you know how it goes. UPDATE, 24 DEC 2016: Video of interview here.

On shanghaibirding.com I have addressed the issue of conserving Nanhui:

Save the Nanhui Wetland Reserve! (cri de coeur plus call to action)
Remnants (preparation for probable demise of Cape Nanhui)
Reed Parrotbill, Symbol of Shanghai (naming Reed Parrotbill Provincial Bird of Shanghai will send a message about the importance of the reed beds such as those at Cape Nanhui)
Spoon-billed Sandpiper at Nanhui (proof of yet another endangered species using the defunct wetland reserve at Nanhui)
Will the Spoon Survive? (Nanhui is not the only area under threat. You ought to see the mess at Yangkou, Jiangsu. Conserving Nanhui will offset the losses elsewhere on the Chinese coast and will put a conservationist feather in Shanghai’s cap)
Meet Kai Pflug, Nanhui’s Mr. Clean (tribute to a birder doing his small part)

NEXT STEPS

We foreigners have had much to say about the future of Nanhui. I would like to hear more from Chinese. Is the case for a world-class wetland reserve at Nanhui convincing to you? If so, then what do you propose to do to bring it about?

THE GRAND SHANGHAI TOUR

Siberian Crane at the newly reclaimed extension of Hengsha Island, Nov. 2016.
Siberian Crane at the newly reclaimed extension of Hengsha Island, 29 Nov. 2016. The cranes have been at this spot (31.321708, 122.018141) since at least 12 Nov. 2016. It is not known exactly what drew the cranes to Hengsha. Disturbances at Lake Poyang, the wintering location of nearly every member of the species, may be a factor. Since 2000 Grus leucogeranus has been listed as Critically Endangered. Only about 3750 individuals remain. Photo by Craig Brelsford.

Elaine Du and I birded five of the eight days from Thurs. 24 Nov. through Thurs. 1 Dec. 2016. We noted 119 species. We did the Shanghai Grand Tour, covering Zhongshan Park, a small, inner-city park; Binjiang Forest Park and Binhai Forest Park, large, suburban parks; the coastal areas at Cape Nanhui; Hengsha Island; and Chongming Island. We birded one of the days with Shanghai-based British birder Michael Grunwell and two days with Phil Birch.

We had 3 Siberian Crane and 8 Mandarin Duck on Hengsha, 98 Hooded Crane at their normal wintering spot on Chongming Island, 5 Baikal Teal and Japanese Grosbeak at Cape Nanhui, and 51 Swan Goose at Nanhui and on Chongming. Black-faced Spoonbill were present in diminished numbers at Nanhui and on Hengsha.

Nanhui gave us Common Shelduck, Greater Scaup, Black-necked Grebe at Dishui Lake, and Brown-cheeked Rail near Iron Track. Eurasian Curlew were foraging on mud near 3 Black-tailed Godwit and a single Bar-tailed Godwit. At a high-tide roost in the defunct nature reserve, a single late Red-necked Stint stood out among 600 Dunlin. We found 2 Bluethroat at a new location north of the Dazhi River. Reed Parrotbill maintained their regular presence around Iron Track, and we found 4 Rustic Bunting at Binhai Forest Park, 4 km inland from the coastal birding areas at Nanhui.

Bluethroat, scarce winter visitor to Shanghai.
Bluethroat, scarce winter visitor to Shanghai, 27 Nov. 2016. Craig Brelsford.

Hensgha also gave us Common Merganser, late Intermediate Egret, 2 Hair-crested Drongo, and 1 of our 2 Chinese Grey Shrike (the other was at Nanhui). Chongming yielded 3 Common Crane with the Hooded Crane as well as Northern Lapwing, 3 juv. Rook, and 35 Lapland Longspur.

Binjiang Forest Park added to our list Great Spotted Woodpecker, a species that in Shanghai’s parks is reliable only at Binjiang and Century Park. We had 3 Hawfinch, Collared Finchbill, and 3 Naumann’s Thrush.

NOTES

— In recent days at its special site (30.850707, 121.863662) north of Luchao, Yellow-breasted Bunting was not found on two occasions. We found it there six times throughout most of November.

Yellow-throated Bunting and most other woodland birds were absent from the Cape Nanhui microforests. The leaves of the locust trees in the microforests have fallen, the undergrowth has died off, and the woodsy feel has faded even at large Microforest 4 (30.953225, 121.959083). Eurasian Tree Sparrow have invaded some of the microforests. We found Pallas’s Reed Bunting in Microforest 4 but neither Red-flanked Bluetail nor White’s Thrush.

Comparison of adult-male Chinese Grosbeak (bottom L) and Japanese Grosbeak (all others). Craig Brelsford.
Comparison of adult-male Chinese Grosbeak Eophona migratoria (bottom L) and adult-male Japanese Grosbeak E. personata (all others). The half-hood and completely yellow beak of male Japanese are easily recognizable features and contrast with the full hood and black-tipped bill of Chinese. The wing of Chinese (bottom L) shows a larger white patch on the primaries as well as white tips. Secondaries and tertials are fringed white. Japanese (middle L) shows only a simple white patch on otherwise blue-black primaries. Thrush-sized Japanese is also 20 percent larger than Chinese. Chinese Grosbeak is present year-round in Shanghai and even breeds in inner-city parks. Japanese Grosbeak is an uncommon passage migrant. Bottom L: Wusong Paotaiwan Park, Shanghai, 19 Sept. 2009. Others Magic Parking Lot, Nanhui, 28 Nov. 2016. All by Craig Brelsford.

Japanese Grosbeak found in Magic Parking Lot 28 Nov. provided my longest and best view ever of the species. I appreciated its large size, like a thrush; I noted its half-hood and completely yellow bill; and I observed its single white spot on the primaries.

HOW WE DO HENGSHA

On the chat group Shanghai Birding, the WeChat companion to shanghaibirding.com, members trade sightings and ask each other questions. To join, go to our Sightings page and fill out the form.

Recently on Shanghai Birding, I was asked how I prefer to cover Hengsha Island. Here is my response:

(1) I prefer to arrive at Hengsha the night before. Ferries run until about 20:00.

(2) I spend the night at a bed-and-breakfast near the reclaimed area. Elaine and I like Héngshā Bànrìxián Mínsù (横沙半日闲民宿), +86 150-2164-5467, +86 135-0185-1814, no English.

(3) Next day, get into reclaimed area before dawn. (Guards man the gate at 08:00 and will bar your entry.)

(4) Bird reclaimed area until about 10:00, then return to ferry terminal.

We have followed this procedure several times. The ferry has never been crowded in the evening and has never been crowded the next forenoon. By contrast, I have never sailed through when attempting to get the 07:00 or 07:30 ferry. The line has always been long.

Besides saving time waiting in line, an advantage to spending the night on Hengsha is that one gets more sleep. You are fresher the next morning, and you are in the reclaimed area earlier.

Day Lists
Lists are generated on eBird then adjusted to comport with my first reference, the IOC World Bird List.

List 1 of 1 for Thurs. 24 Nov. 2016 (11 species)

Photo by Mr. Wang.
On 24 Nov. 2016, I was standing beside Wāng Jìn Róng (汪进荣) when he got this shot of an adult-male Eyebrowed Thrush. The thrush was drinking from a cavity high in a tree at Zhongshan Park. In recent days, seven species of thrush have been recorded around the Little Central Pond in the 102-year-old park.

Zhongshan Park (Zhōngshān Gōngyuán [中山公园]; 31.221888, 121.420066), urban green space in Changning District, Shanghai. Mostly cloudy. Low 3° C, high 9° C. Humidity 58%. Visibility 10 km. Wind N 15 km/h. PM2.5 AQI: 134 (unhealthful). Sunrise 06:30, sunset 16:52. THU 24 NOV 2016 15:10-16:45. Craig Brelsford.

Feral Pigeon (Rock Dove) Columba livia 20
Spotted Dove Streptopelia chinensis 4
Long-tailed Shrike Lanius schach 1
Japanese Tit Parus minor 2
Light-vented Bulbul Pycnonotus sinensis 25
Pallas’s Leaf Warbler Phylloscopus proregulus 6
White’s Thrush Zoothera aurea 1
Chinese Blackbird Turdus mandarinus 8
Eyebrowed Thrush T. obscurus 1
Red-flanked Bluetail Tarsiger cyanurus 4
Eurasian Tree Sparrow Passer montanus 50

List 1 of 1 for Sun. 27 Nov. 2016 (71 species)

Views of Buff-bellied Pipit in flight. Top 2: 12 Nov. 2016. Bottom 3: 27 Nov. 2016. All taken near the reed beds north of Luchao. Craig Brelsford.
Buff-bellied Pipit in flight. Top 2: 12 Nov. 2016. Bottom 3: 27 Nov. 2016. All taken at Marshy Agricultural Land north of Luchao (30.850707, 121.863662). Craig Brelsford.

Birds noted around Pudong Nanhui Dongtan Wetland (Pǔdōng Nánhuì Dōngtān Shīdì [浦东南汇东滩湿地]; 30.920507, 121.973159), Pudong, Shanghai, China. We covered the coastal road from Binhai (Bīnhǎi Zhèn [滨海镇]; 31.006250, 121.885558) to Luchao (Lúcháo Gǎng [芦潮港]; 30.851109, 121.848455). Among the points along this 30 km stretch are Iron Track (31.003613, 121.907883), a site providing access to the reed beds at the mouth of the Dazhi River (Dàzhì Hé [大治河]); Big Bend (31.000321, 121.938074); Microforest 4 (30.953225, 121.959083); Microforest 1 (30.923889, 121.971635); Magic Parking Lot (30.884898, 121.968229); Magic GPS Point (30.880563, 121.964551); South Lock (30.860073, 121.909997); Eiffel Tower (30.850531, 121.878047); & the Marshy Agricultural Land (30.850707, 121.863662). List does not include Dishui Lake (30.908702, 121.945124). Sunny. Low 6° C, high 12° C. Humidity 55%. Visibility: 10 km. Wind NNW 18 km/h. PM2.5 AQI: 182 (unhealthful). Sunrise 06:33, sunset 16:51. SUN 27 NOV 2016 06:50-16:25. Craig Brelsford, Elaine Du, & Michael Grunwell.

Swan Goose Anser cygnoides 8
Tundra Bean Goose A. serrirostris 11
Tundra Swan Cygnus columbianus bewickii 20
Falcated Duck Anas falcata 1
Eurasian Wigeon A. penelope 100
Mallard A. platyrhynchos 200
Eastern Spot-billed Duck A. zonorhyncha 70
Baikal Teal A. formosa 3
Eurasian Teal A. crecca 600
Tufted Duck Aythya fuligula 92
Common Pheasant Phasianus colchicus 1
Little Grebe Tachybaptus ruficollis 40
Great Crested Grebe Podiceps cristatus 120
Black-necked Grebe P. nigricollis 9
Great Cormorant Phalacrocorax carbo 130
Grey Heron Ardea cinerea 80
Great Egret A. alba 5
Little Egret Egretta garzetta 30
Chinese Pond Heron Ardeola bacchus 1
Black-crowned Night Heron Nycticorax nycticorax 5
Eurasian Spoonbill Platalea leucorodia 78
Black-faced Spoonbill P. minor 2
Eastern Marsh Harrier Circus spilonotus 2
Hen Harrier C. cyaneus 1
Eastern Buzzard Buteo japonicus 4
White-breasted Waterhen Amaurornis phoenicurus 1
Common Moorhen Gallinula chloropus 7
Eurasian Coot Fulica atra 400
Pied Avocet Recurvirostra avosetta 10
Grey Plover Pluvialis squatarola 8
Northern Lapwing Vanellus vanellus 120
Kentish Plover Charadrius alexandrinus 40
Dunlin Calidris alpina 120
Long-billed Dowitcher Limnodromus scolopaceus 1
Common Sandpiper Actitis hypoleucos 4
Green Sandpiper Tringa ochropus 3
Spotted Redshank T. erythropus 202
Common Greenshank T. nebularia 9
Vega Gull Larus vegae vegae/L. v. mongolicus 8
Feral Pigeon (Rock Dove) Columba livia 1
Spotted Dove Streptopelia chinensis 3
Eurasian Hoopoe Upupa epops 1
Common Kingfisher Alcedo atthis 1
Common Kestrel Falco tinnunculus 1
Long-tailed Shrike Lanius schach 32
Chinese Grey Shrike L. sphenocercus sphenocercus 1
Eurasian/Oriental Skylark Alauda arvensis/gulgula 4
Chinese Penduline Tit Remiz consobrinus 30
Light-vented Bulbul Pycnonotus sinensis 10
Japanese/Manchurian Bush Warbler Horornis diphone canturians/H. borealis borealis 1
Pallas’s Leaf Warbler Phylloscopus proregulus 4
Plain Prinia Prinia inornata 3
Vinous-throated Parrotbill Sinosuthora webbiana 25
White-cheeked Starling Spodiopsar cineraceus 6
Crested Myna Acridotheres cristatellus 13
White’s Thrush Zoothera aurea 2
Pale Thrush Turdus pallidus 5
Dusky Thrush T. eunomus 53
Bluethroat Luscinia svecica 2
Red-flanked Bluetail Tarsiger cyanurus 2
Daurian Redstart Phoenicurus auroreus 10
Eastern Yellow Wagtail Motacilla tschutschensis taivana 30
White Wagtail M. alba 17
Olive-backed Pipit Anthus hodgsoni 1
Buff-bellied Pipit A. rubescens 3
Eurasian Tree Sparrow Passer montanus 140
Chestnut-eared Bunting Emberiza fucata 17
Little Bunting E. pusilla 6
Yellow-throated Bunting E. elegans 1
Black-faced Bunting E. spodocephala 10
Pallas’s Reed Bunting E. pallasi 17

List 1 of 2 for Mon. 28 Nov. 2016 (76 species)

Eurasian Hoopoe, sea wall at Cape Nanhui, 27 Nov. 2016. Also seen nearby the following day. Craig Brelsford.
Eurasian Hoopoe, sea wall at Cape Nanhui, 27 Nov. 2016. Craig Brelsford.

Birds noted around Pudong Nanhui Dongtan Wetland (Pǔdōng Nánhuì Dōngtān Shīdì [浦东南汇东滩湿地]; 30.920507, 121.973159), Pudong, Shanghai, China. We covered the coastal road from Binhai (Bīnhǎi Zhèn [滨海镇]; 31.006250, 121.885558) to Luchao (Lúcháo Gǎng [芦潮港]; 30.851109, 121.848455). Among the points along this 30 km stretch are Iron Track (31.003613, 121.907883), a site providing access to the reed beds at the mouth of the Dazhi River (Dàzhì Hé [大治河]); Big Bend (31.000321, 121.938074); Microforest 4 (30.953225, 121.959083); Microforest 1 (30.923889, 121.971635); Magic Parking Lot (30.884898, 121.968229); Magic GPS Point (30.880563, 121.964551); South Lock (30.860073, 121.909997); Eiffel Tower (30.850531, 121.878047); & the Marshy Agricultural Land (30.850707, 121.863662). List includes birds found at Dishui Lake (30.908702, 121.945124). Sunny. Low 6° C, high 13° C. Humidity 57%. Visibility: 10 km. Wind N 18 km/h. PM2.5 AQI: 127 (unhealthful). Sunrise 06:34, sunset 16:51. MON 28 NOV 2016 06:15-14:40, 16:00-17:00. Phil Birch, Craig Brelsford, & Elaine Du.

Swan Goose Anser cygnoides 15
Tundra Bean Goose A. serrirostris 11
Tundra Swan Cygnus columbianus bewickii 10
Common Shelduck Tadorna tadorna 25
Falcated Duck Anas falcata 200
Eurasian Wigeon A. penelope 30
Mallard A. platyrhynchos 50
Eastern Spot-billed Duck A. zonorhyncha 80
Northern Shoveler A. clypeata 40
Northern Pintail A. acuta 30
Baikal Teal A. formosa 2
Eurasian Teal A. crecca 150
Common Pochard Aythya ferina 1
Tufted Duck A. fuligula 30
Greater Scaup A. marila 3
Common Pheasant Phasianus colchicus 4
Little Grebe Tachybaptus ruficollis 60
Great Crested Grebe Podiceps cristatus 10
Black-necked Grebe P. nigricollis 12
Great Cormorant Phalacrocorax carbo 100
Grey Heron Ardea cinerea 70
Great Egret A. alba 20
Little Egret Egretta garzetta 80
Chinese Pond Heron Ardeola bacchus 4
Black-crowned Night Heron Nycticorax nycticorax 6
Eurasian Spoonbill Platalea leucorodia 30
Black-faced Spoonbill P. minor 2
Western Osprey Eurasian Pandion haliaetus 2
Eastern Buzzard Buteo japonicus 1
Water/Brown-cheeked Rail R. aquaticus/indicus 1
Common Moorhen Gallinula chloropus 1
Eurasian Coot Fulica atra 150
Pied Avocet Recurvirostra avosetta 2
Grey Plover Pluvialis squatarola 30
Kentish Plover Charadrius alexandrinus 100
Eurasian Curlew Numenius arquata 3
Black-tailed Godwit Limosa limosa 3
Bar-tailed Godwit L. lapponica 1
Red-necked Stint Calidris ruficollis 1
Dunlin C. alpina 600
Common Snipe Gallinago gallinago 7
Common Sandpiper Actitis hypoleucos 1
Spotted Redshank Tringa erythropus 150
Common Greenshank T. nebularia 12
Vega Gull Larus vegae vegae/L. v. mongolicus 4
Feral Pigeon (Rock Dove) Columba livia 18
Oriental Turtle Dove Streptopelia orientalis 2
Spotted Dove S. chinensis 4
Eurasian Hoopoe Upupa epops 2
Common Kestrel Falco tinnunculus 2
Peregrine Falcon F. peregrinus 1
Falco sp. 1
Long-tailed Shrike Lanius schach 30
Eurasian/Oriental Skylark Alauda arvensis/gulgula 6
Barn Swallow Hirundo rustica 1
Chinese Penduline Tit Remiz consobrinus 15
Light-vented Bulbul Pycnonotus sinensis 12
Pallas’s Leaf Warbler Phylloscopus proregulus 5
Zitting Cisticola Cisticola juncidis 1
Plain Prinia Prinia inornata 8
Reed Parrotbill Paradoxornis heudei 12
Vinous-throated Parrotbill Sinosuthora webbiana 30
White-cheeked Starling Spodiopsar cineraceus 5
Crested Myna Acridotheres cristatellus 60
Pale Thrush Turdus pallidus 11
Dusky Thrush T. eunomus 33
Daurian Redstart Phoenicurus auroreus 14
Eurasian Tree Sparrow Passer montanus 100
Eastern Yellow Wagtail Motacilla tschutschensis taivana 8
White Wagtail M. alba 20
Buff-bellied Pipit Anthus rubescens 8
Brambling Fringilla montifringilla 1
Japanese Grosbeak Eophona personata 1
Chestnut-eared Bunting Emberiza fucata 8
Little Bunting E. pusilla 2
Black-faced Bunting E. spodocephala 8
Pallas’s Reed Bunting E. pallasi 2

List 2 of 2 for Mon. 28 Nov. 2016 (19 species). Shanghai Binhai Forest Park (Shànghǎi Bīnhǎi Sēnlín Gōngyuán [上海滨海森林公园]; 30.966324, 121.910289), a green space in Pudong, Shanghai, China. Sunny. Low 6° C, high 13° C. Humidity 57%. Visibility: 10 km. Wind N 18 km/h. PM2.5 AQI: 127 (unhealthful). Sunrise 06:34, sunset 16:51. MON 28 NOV 2016 14:40-16:00. Phil Birch, Craig Brelsford, & Elaine Du.

Little Grebe Tachybaptus ruficollis 2
Little Egret Egretta garzetta 5
Spotted Dove Streptopelia chinensis 6
Long-tailed Shrike Lanius schach 7
Japanese Tit Parus minor 1
Light-vented Bulbul Pycnonotus sinensis 25
Pallas’s Leaf Warbler Phylloscopus proregulus 4
White-cheeked Starling Spodiopsar cineraceus 3
Crested Myna Acridotheres cristatellus 5
Chinese Blackbird Turdus mandarinus 1
Pale Thrush T. pallidus 8
Dusky Thrush T. eunomus 20
Red-flanked Bluetail Tarsiger cyanurus 5
Daurian Redstart Phoenicurus auroreus 8
Olive-backed Pipit Anthus hodgsoni 2
Buff-bellied Pipit A. rubescens 1
Brambling Fringilla montifringilla 2
Rustic Bunting Emberiza rustica 4
Black-faced Bunting E. spodocephala 3

List 1 of 3 for Tues. 29 Nov. 2016 (46 species)

Eastern Marsh Harrier, Hengsha. Craig Brelsford.
Eastern Marsh Harrier, Hengsha, 29 Nov. 2016. Craig Brelsford.

Birds noted on Hengsha Island (Héngshā Dǎo [横沙岛]), small alluvial island at mouth of Yangtze River in Shanghai, China. S gate to reclaimed area at 31.298821, 121.854439. Cloudy. Low 7° C, high 13° C. Humidity 67%. Visibility: 10 km. Wind ENE 15 km/h. PM2.5 AQI: 53 (moderate). Sunrise 06:34, sunset 16:51. TUE 29 NOV 2016 06:20-09:40. Phil Birch, Craig Brelsford, & Elaine Du.

Mandarin Duck Aix galericulata 8
Gadwall Anas strepera 40
Mallard A. platyrhynchos 5
Eastern Spot-billed Duck A. zonorhyncha 15
Northern Shoveler A. clypeata 4
Eurasian Teal A. crecca 50
Common Merganser Mergus merganser 1
Little Grebe Tachybaptus ruficollis 15
Great Cormorant Phalacrocorax carbo 1
Eurasian Bittern Botaurus stellaris 3
Grey Heron Ardea cinerea 35
Great Egret A. alba 2
Intermediate Egret A. intermedia 1
Little Egret Egretta garzetta 30
Eastern Cattle Egret Bubulcus coromandus 6
Eurasian Spoonbill Platalea leucorodia 13
Black-faced Spoonbill P. minor 1
Eastern Marsh Harrier Circus spilonotus 3
Eastern Buzzard Buteo japonicus 1
Water/Brown-cheeked Rail Rallus aquaticus/indicus 1
Brown-cheeked Rail R. indicus 1
Common Moorhen Gallinula chloropus 15
Eurasian Coot Fulica atra 6
Siberian Crane Grus leucogeranus 3
Northern Lapwing Vanellus vanellus 14
Spotted Redshank Tringa erythropus 12
Common Kingfisher Alcedo atthis 1
Long-tailed Shrike Lanius schach 8
Chinese Grey Shrike L. sphenocercus sphenocercus 1
Hair-crested Drongo Dicrurus hottentottus 2
Eurasian Magpie Pica pica 2
Oriental Skylark Alauda gulgula 1
Eurasian/Oriental Skylark A. arvensis/gulgula 6
Chinese Penduline Tit Remiz consobrinus 15
Light-vented Bulbul Pycnonotus sinensis 5
Yellow-browed Warbler Phylloscopus inornatus 2
Plain Prinia Prinia inornata 6
Reed Parrotbill Paradoxornis heudei 4
Vinous-throated Parrotbill Sinosuthora webbiana 12
Crested Myna Acridotheres cristatellus 25
Pale Thrush Turdus pallidus 2
Dusky Thrush T. eunomus 2
Daurian Redstart Phoenicurus auroreus 6
Eurasian Tree Sparrow Passer montanus 25
White Wagtail Motacilla alba 5
Buff-bellied Pipit Anthus rubescens 12
Black-faced Bunting Emberiza spodocephala 1
Pallas’s Reed Bunting E. pallasi 1

List 2 of 3 for Tues. 29 Nov. 2016 (35 species). Around Chongming Dongtan National Bird Sanctuary and Nature Reserve (Chóngmíng Dōngtān Niǎolèi Guójiājí Zìrán Bǎohùqū [崇明东滩鸟类国家级自然保护区]), Chongming District, Chongming Island, Shanghai, China (31.510109, 121.961955). Cloudy. Low 7° C, high 13° C. Humidity 67%. Visibility: 10 km. Wind ENE 15 km/h. PM2.5 AQI: 53 (moderate). Sunrise 06:34, sunset 16:51. TUE 29 NOV 2016 11:10-13:05. Phil Birch, Craig Brelsford, & Elaine Du.

Swan Goose Anser cygnoides 28
Tundra Bean Goose A. serrirostris 30
Tundra Swan Cygnus columbianus bewickii 5
Eastern Spot-billed Duck Anas zonorhyncha 100
Little Grebe Tachybaptus ruficollis 7
Great Cormorant Phalacrocorax carbo 60
Grey Heron Ardea cinerea 20
Great Egret A. alba 2
Little Egret Egretta garzetta 10
Eurasian Spoonbill Platalea leucorodia 1
Common Crane Grus grus 3
Hooded Crane G. monacha 98
Northern Lapwing Vanellus vanellus 50
Common Snipe Gallinago gallinago 1
Spotted Redshank Tringa erythropus 10
Common Greenshank T. nebularia 2
Vega Gull Larus vegae vegae/L. v. mongolicus 30
Common Kestrel Falco tinnunculus 1
Peregrine Falcon F. peregrinus 4
Long-tailed Shrike Lanius schach 8
Eurasian Magpie Pica pica 20
Rook Corvus frugilegus 3
Eurasian/Oriental Skylark Alauda arvensis/gulgula 1
Chinese Penduline Tit Remiz consobrinus 5
Light-vented Bulbul Pycnonotus sinensis 3
Crested Myna Acridotheres cristatellus 10
Pale Thrush Turdus pallidus 2
Dusky Thrush T. eunomus 1
Red-flanked Bluetail Tarsiger cyanurus 1
Daurian Redstart Phoenicurus auroreus 12
White Wagtail Motacilla alba 4
Red-throated Pipit Anthus cervinus 1
Buff-bellied Pipit A. rubescens 4
Eurasian Tree Sparrow Passer montanus 400
Lapland Longspur Calcarius lapponicus 35

List 3 of 3 for Tues. 29 Nov. 2016 (25 species). Binjiang Forest Park, Pudong New Area (Pǔdōng Xīn Qū [浦东新区]), Shanghai, China (31.383916, 121.523818). Cloudy. Low 7° C, high 13° C. Humidity 67%. Visibility: 10 km. Wind ENE 15 km/h. PM2.5 AQI: 53 (moderate). Sunrise 06:34, sunset 16:51. TUE 29 NOV 2016 14:30-16:00. Phil Birch, Craig Brelsford, & Elaine Du.

Little Grebe Tachybaptus ruficollis 1
Feral Pigeon (Rock Dove) Columba livia 1
Oriental Turtle Dove Streptopelia orientalis 10
Spotted Dove S. chinensis 5
Great Spotted Woodpecker Dendrocopos major 1
Long-tailed Shrike Lanius schach 3
Azure-winged Magpie Cyanopica cyanus 4
Collared Finchbill Spizixos semitorques 1
Light-vented Bulbul Pycnonotus sinensis 20
Chinese Hwamei Garrulax canorus 2
White’s Thrush Zoothera aurea 3
Grey-backed Thrush Turdus hortulorum 3
Chinese Blackbird T. mandarinus 20
Eyebrowed Thrush T. obscurus 1
Pale Thrush T. pallidus 18
Dusky Thrush T. eunomus 35
Naumann’s Thrush T. naumanni 3
Red-flanked Bluetail Tarsiger cyanurus 3
Eurasian Tree Sparrow Passer montanus 10
White Wagtail Motacilla alba 7
Olive-backed Pipit Anthus hodgsoni 11
Brambling Fringilla montifringilla 10
Hawfinch Coccothraustes coccothraustes 3
Chinese Grosbeak Eophona migratoria 2
Yellow-throated Bunting Emberiza elegans 2

List 1 of 1 for Thurs. 1 Dec. 2016 (9 species)

Panorama of Little Central Pond, Zhongshan Park, 1 Dec. 2016. Thrushes are drawn to the berry-laden trees on either side of the pond. The photographer to the left is Wāng Jīnlóng (汪金龙), a mainstay at Zhongshan Park and a source of information about the birds there. Craig Brelsford.
Panorama of Little Central Pond, Zhongshan Park, 1 Dec. 2016. Thrushes are drawn to the berry-laden trees on either side of the pond. Currently, seven species of thrush may be found there: the four listed below plus three missed by us on 1 Dec. (White’s Thrush, Dusky Thrush, and Japanese Thrush). The photographer to the left is Wāng Jìn Róng (汪进荣), a mainstay at Zhongshan Park and a reliable source of information about the birds there. Craig Brelsford.

Zhongshan Park (Zhōngshān Gōngyuán [中山公园]; 31.221888, 121.420066), urban green space in Changning District, Shanghai. Mostly cloudy. Low 9° C, high 14° C. Humidity 57%. Visibility 10 km. Wind N 15 km/h. PM2.5 AQI: 192 (unhealthful). Sunrise 06:36, sunset 16:51. THU 01 DEC 2016 15:10-16:15. Craig Brelsford & Elaine Du.

Spotted Dove Streptopelia chinensis 5
Long-tailed Shrike Lanius schach 2
Japanese Tit Parus minor 2
Light-vented Bulbul Pycnonotus sinensis 8
Red-flanked Bluetail Tarsiger cyanurus 3
Grey-backed Thrush Turdus hortulorum 4
Chinese Blackbird T. mandarinus 3
Eyebrowed Thrush T. obscurus 4
Pale Thrush T. pallidus 1

Remnants

Editor’s note: The photo above shows a remnant of the reed beds that used to cover Nanhui and much of the Shanghai Peninsula. The photo is from Iron Track (31.003613, 121.907883), part of a reed bed 450,000 square meters in size lining the Dazhi River near Binhai. As the birding areas at Nanhui fall to the backhoe, future birders searching for species will turn to hidden corners such as this one.

This post is part of a series on the riches of the environment in Nanhui and the threats to those riches. Other posts in the series:

Reed Parrotbill, Symbol of Shanghai
Spoon-billed Sandpiper at Nanhui
Save the Nanhui Wetland Reserve!

Though its position between the Yangtze River and Hangzhou Bay makes it among the richest birding areas on the coast of China, the southeastern tip of Pudong enjoys virtually no protection. The continued transformation of Cape Nanhui is likely, with the reed beds at particular risk. As the backhoes advance, birders ask: Where will we go to find our birds?

Answer: to the remnants.

Craig Brelsford searches for Brown-cheeked Rail in one of the extensive reed beds east of Dishui Lake. Photo taken 16 Jan. 2016 by Elaine Du.
Craig Brelsford searches for Brown-cheeked Rail in one of the extensive reed beds east of Dishui Lake. All may seem well here, but the reeds to the south of the photo have been destroyed, and to the north is the defunct nature reserve. It is highly possible that here too the reed bed will be dredged and plowed under and that in the end only fragments of the original habitat will remain. That would be a pity, because the reed beds at Cape Nanhui are some of the largest and best-preserved on the central Chinese coast. Photo taken 16 Jan. 2016 by Elaine Du.

Like archeologists examining a ruin, future birders at Cape Nanhui will scour the fragments of a once-great coastal wetland and try to imagine how the place once looked. Most of the land will have been transformed. Even now, in some of the agricultural areas around Binhai (31.007757, 121.885624) and Luchao (30.857299, 121.850590), nearly all of the original reed-bed habitat has disappeared.

If those future birders look hard, though, they will find intact pieces, islands of untouched habitat. Even around Binhai and Luchao, there are such places. Reed beds line man-made canals and larger waterways such as the Dazhi River, the mouth of which holds about 450,000 square meters of good reed-bed habitat. In these fragments, wild birds flourish, much as they always have done, though on a smaller scale.

Binhai lies to the north of the main birding areas east of Dishui Lake. Luchao is to the south. These towns border the 30-km stretch of coastline at Cape Nanhui. These built-up places point to the likely future of the areas just east of Dishui Lake, which have developed more slowly and to this day still hold pristine reed beds. (One of the largest covers 1.4 sq. km and has its center point at 30.876060, 121.945305.)

Craig Brelsford leaves walks up the inner base of the sea wall near Luchao, 10 Nov. 2016.
Craig Brelsford walks up the inner base of the sea wall near Luchao, 19 Nov. 2016. In the midground is a narrow line of reeds in which a Lesser Coucal was foraging. The coordinates of this point are 30.849433, 121.881834. Half a kilometer south, a more extensive reed bed measures 75 m by 2500 m. Photo by Elaine Du.

The reed beds east of Dishui are impenetrable–a wilderness within the city. We know that they are rich in birds, and we know that they hold species at risk, among them breeding Marsh Grassbird Locustella pryeri, listed as Near Threatened by IUCN. Judging by their frequency of occurrence at the edges of the reed beds, where they are regularly seen and heard, Near Threatened Reed Parrotbill must number in the high hundreds at Nanhui. Just this past Saturday, our team found Near Threatened Japanese Reed Bunting.

Lesser Coucal in remnant reed bed near Eiffel Tower (30.850531, 121.878047). The coucal was very much at home and gave us the impression that it had been born there. The reed beds in the Luchao area have been reduced to about 1% of their historic extension, but even that 1% is enough to support a small community of birds, among them Yellow-breasted Bunting at a nearby site (30.850707, 121.863662).
Lesser Coucal in remnant reed bed near Eiffel Tower (30.849433, 121.881834). The coucal was very much at home and may have been born there. The reed beds in the Luchao area have been reduced to less than 1 percent of their historical extension. Those specks of habitat support a scaled-down community of the birds once common in Shanghai.

Even the tiny fragments near the towns hold a surprisingly high number of species. At a site (30.850707, 121.863662) north of Luchao, in reeds lining a canal at the base of the sea wall, Yellow-breasted Bunting have been present throughout November. On Saturday we found this Endangered species for the sixth time in six tries since our first sighting there on 5 Nov.

Chestnut-eared Bunting amid a world of reeds at the site north of Luchao, 19 Nov. 2016.
Chestnut-eared Bunting in a world of reeds at the site (30.850707, 121.863662) north of Luchao currently reliable for Yellow-breasted Bunting. The site is part of a reed bed measuring 75 m by 2500 m–188,000 square meters of precious reed-bed habitat. Decades ago, such a modest parcel of land would have seemed a drop in the bucket. Today, remnants such as this provide habitat critically important to dozens of species once common in the area, among them the two aforementioned species of bunting as well as Brown Crake, Lesser Coucal, and Reed Parrotbill.

The site, part of a reedy area 75 m wide and 2500 m long, also yielded a small flock of Reed Parrotbill as well as wintering Chestnut-eared Bunting and Pallas’s Reed Bunting. Just north of the site, near Eiffel Tower (30.850531, 121.878047), there is an even smaller fragment of reed bed. There, we had juvenile Lesser Coucal.

Reed beds are an extremely rich habitat, and even a tiny area can hold many birds. Even if disaster continues to befall the large reed beds that still exist near Dishui Lake, not quite everything will have been lost. Birding will go on–in the remnants.

78 SPECIES AT CAPE NANHUI

The Hooded Crane was feeding, a sign that it was relaxing despite being 60 km away from the regular wintering site of Hooded Crane at eastern Chongming Island. On Sat. 12 Nov. Elaine, Michael, and I had the first record of Hooded Crane in the history of the Shanghai Peninsula (see latest post on shanghaibirding.com). This almost certainly is the same bird. Hooded Crane is listed as Vulnerable. About 11,500 individuals remain. The key threats to its existence are, in the words of IUCN, "wetland loss and degradation in its wintering grounds in China and South Korea."
The Hooded Crane was feeding, a sign that it was functioning normally despite being at Nanhui, a location not really suitable to cranes and 60 km south of the regular Hooded Crane wintering site on eastern Chongming Island. On Sat. 12 Nov. 2016, Michael Grunwell, Elaine Du, and I had the first record of Hooded Crane in the history of the Shanghai Peninsula. The crane shown here, found at a point (30.940284, 121.958120) just a few hundred meters from the site of that first encounter, is almost certainly the same bird. Grus monacha is listed as Vulnerable. About 11,500 remain. The main threats to its existence are, in the words of IUCN, “wetland loss and degradation in its wintering grounds in China and South Korea.”

On Sat. 19 Nov. 2016, Michael Grunwell, Elaine Du, and I birded Cape Nanhui. We found 78 species. We had Japanese Reed Bunting on the north side of the defunct wetland reserve (30.926452, 121.958517), the Hooded Crane that apparently spent a week in Nanhui, a single Baikal Teal (and presumably others shrouded in haze), a juvenile Lesser Coucal very much at home in remnant reed bed near Luchao, and Yellow-breasted Bunting at its reliable spot (30.850707, 121.863662).

Non-passerines: Tundra Swan (bewickii) 6 on the mudflats, Black-faced Spoonbill 6 in the defunct wetland reserve, Eurasian Spoonbill 45, Black-faced/Eurasian Spoonbill 30 in haze with bills tucked in, Black-tailed Godwit 1, Red Knot 2, Temminck’s Stint 1, Red-necked Stint 7, Dunlin 850.

Passerines: Brown-flanked Bush Warbler 1, Naumann’s Thrush 1, Chestnut-eared Bunting 15, Taiga/Red-breasted Flycatcher 1 (seen in poor light by Elaine; presumably the same confirmed Red-breasted Flycatcher found by Kai Pflug).

SIDE TRIP TO BINHAI FOREST PARK

'Cape Nanhui' is the southeastern-most point of Pudong (red) and the city-province of Shanghai. Map courtesy Wikipedia.
I published this map last week, but I think it is worth examining it again. ‘Cape Nanhui’ is an important birding area not just because it is coastal but also because it is a headland–the southeastern-most point of Pudong (red) and the entire city-province of Shanghai (yellow areas plus Pudong). Migrating birds hugging the coastline are drawn to areas that jut out. Just a few hundred meters inland, however, the intensity fades. The bird mix at places such as Binhai Forest Park (30.966324, 121.910289), just 4.5 km inland, closely resembles that of the urban parks farther inland. Map courtesy Wikipedia.

On Saturday our team made its first trip since 31 Oct. 2015 to Binhai Forest Park (30.966324, 121.910289). The site yielded a late Mugimaki Flycatcher. More importantly, the brief visit gave us insights into the nature of migratory birds.

Though just 4.5 km inland, Binhai offers a mix of birds more akin to that of Century Park (22 km inland) than the coastal areas much nearer-by. Passerines moving through our region clearly hug the shoreline, especially around headlands such as Cape Nanhui.

Some of the smaller Nanhui microforests, such as Microforest 2 (30.926013, 121.970705), are about the size of a tennis court. But as they are a stone’s throw from the sea, they hold a much greater density of passage migrants than Binhai, which is 1600 times larger (1.5 sq. km) than Microforest 2.

HOW WE FOUND JAPANESE REED BUNTING

Japanese Reed Bunting Emberiza yessoensis. The IUCN lists it as Near Threatened because of the loss of wetland habitat in its breeding range (which includes Heilongjiang) as well as in its wintering grounds. The continued degradation of the Nanhui coastal marshes is a prime example of the general problems this species faces.
Japanese Reed Bunting Emberiza yessoensis, defunct nature reserve (30.926452, 121.958517), Nanhui, 19 Nov. 2016. Owing to the loss of wetland habitat in its breeding range (which in China includes Heilongjiang) as well as in its wintering grounds, IUCN lists the species as Near Threatened.

Michael, Elaine, and I were on the unpaved track on the north side of the defunct Nanhui reserve (30.926452, 121.958517). We were studying the roosting shorebirds and spoonbills. I got a call from Wāng Yàjīng (汪亚菁), who along with her husband Chén Qí (陈骐) found Swinhoe’s Rail at Nanhui last month. She told me a Hooded Crane was in the rice paddies 1.5 km north of us.

As we were rushing back to the car, I noted a lone reed bunting in the thick vegetation lining the dirt track. A lone reed bunting struck me as odd; Pallas’s Reed Bunting are common in the area and usually in flocks. I pulled out my camera and got a few images, which I did not have time to check. We got in the car and drove to see the crane.

Only the next day, when I sat down to look at Saturday’s photographic results, did I realize that I had photographed Japanese Reed Bunting Emberiza yessoensis.

Day Lists
Lists are generated on eBird then adjusted to comport with my first reference, the IOC World Bird List.

List 1 of 2 for Sat. 19 Nov. 2016 (69 species)

Blue Rock Thrush is a gem of a bird. Usually I would hesitate to process a photo of a bird on the braces at the base of the Nanhui sea wall, as it is an unnatural environment. But for Blue Rock Thrush, the concrete IS a natural environment, or a close enough replica of the rocky habitats that it favors. Blue Rock Thrush would likely shy away from a completely natural muddy Nanhui coastline.
Blue Rock Thrush Monticola solitarius philippensis, Nanhui, 19 Nov. 2016. Usually I would hesitate to process a photo of a bird on the concrete base of the Nanhui sea wall, as it is an unnatural environment. But for Blue Rock Thrush, this is a natural environment, or a close enough replica of the rocky habitats that it favors. Note the red string attached to the bird’s right tarsus.

Birds noted around Pudong Nanhui Dongtan Wetland (Pǔdōng Nánhuì Dōngtān Shīdì [浦东南汇东滩湿地]; 30.920507, 121.973159), Pudong, Shanghai, China. We covered the coastal road from Binhai (Bīnhǎi Zhèn [滨海镇]; 31.006250, 121.885558) to Luchao (Lúcháo Gǎng [芦潮港]; 30.851109, 121.848455). Among the points along this 30 km stretch are Iron Track (31.003613, 121.907883), a site providing access to the reed beds at the mouth of the Dazhi River (Dàzhì Hé [大治河]); Big Bend (31.000321, 121.938074); Microforest 4 (30.953225, 121.959083); Microforest 1 (30.923889, 121.971635); Magic Parking Lot (30.884898, 121.968229); Magic GPS Point (30.880563, 121.964551); South Lock (30.860073, 121.909997); Eiffel Tower (30.850531, 121.878047); & the Marshy Agricultural Land (30.850707, 121.863662). List does not include Dishui Lake (30.908702, 121.945124). Cloudy, hazy/smoggy. Low 16° C, high 22° C. Humidity 72%. Visibility: 10 km. Wind N 11 km/h. PM2.5 AQI: 200 (very unhealthful). Sunrise 06:26, sunset 16:53. SUN 19 NOV 2016 07:10-09:40, 10:40-17:10. Craig Brelsford, Elaine Du, & Michael Grunwell.

Tundra Bean Goose Anser serrirostris 21
Tundra Swan Cygnus columbianus bewickii 6
Eurasian Wigeon Anas penelope 10
Mallard A. platyrhynchos 45
Eastern Spot-billed Duck A. zonorhyncha 20
Northern Shoveler A. clypeata 50
Northern Pintail A. acuta 2
Baikal Teal A. formosa 1
Eurasian Teal A. crecca 200
Little Grebe Tachybaptus ruficollis 40
Great Cormorant Phalacrocorax carbo 130
Grey Heron Ardea cinerea 120
Great Egret A. alba 15
Little Egret Egretta garzetta 160
Eurasian Spoonbill Platalea leucorodia 45
Black-faced Spoonbill P. minor 6
Eurasian/Black-faced Spoonbill P. leucorodia/minor 30
Western Osprey Pandion haliaetus 1
Eastern Marsh Harrier Circus spilonotus 1
Hen Harrier Circus cyaneus 1
Eastern Buzzard Buteo japonicus 1
rail sp. 1 completely dark
Common Moorhen Gallinula chloropus 8
Hooded Crane Grus monacha 1
Pied Avocet Recurvirostra avosetta 15
Grey Plover Pluvialis squatarola 30
Kentish Plover Charadrius alexandrinus 45
Black-tailed Godwit Limosa limosa 1
Red Knot Calidris canutus 2
Temminck’s Stint C. temminckii 1
Red-necked Stint C. ruficollis 7
Dunlin C. alpina 850
Common Snipe Gallinago gallinago 19
Green Sandpiper Tringa ochropus 1
Spotted Redshank T. erythropus 12
Common Greenshank T. nebularia 6
Vega Gull Larus vegae vegae/L. v. mongolicus 3
Oriental Turtle Dove Streptopelia orientalis 8
Lesser Coucal Centropus bengalensis 1 juv.
Long-eared/Short-eared Owl Asio otus/flammeus 1
Long-tailed Shrike Lanius schach 15
Barn Swallow Hirundo rustica 3
Chinese Penduline Tit Remiz consobrinus 45
Light-vented Bulbul Pycnonotus sinensis 25
Brown-flanked Bush Warbler Horornis fortipes 1
Pallas’s Leaf Warbler Phylloscopus proregulus 8
Yellow-browed Warbler P. inornatus 2
Plain Prinia Prinia inornata 8
Reed Parrotbill Paradoxornis heudei 12
Vinous-throated Parrotbill Sinosuthora webbiana 70
Crested Myna Acridotheres cristatellus 40
Japanese Thrush Turdus cardis 1
Eyebrowed Thrush T. obscurus 2
Pale Thrush T. pallidus 9
Dusky Thrush T. eunomus 18
Naumann’s Thrush T. naumanni 1
Red-flanked Bluetail Tarsiger cyanurus 6
Taiga/Red-breasted Flycatcher Ficedula albicilla/parva 1
Daurian Redstart Phoenicurus auroreus 20
Blue Rock Thrush Monticola solitarius philippensis 1
Eurasian Tree Sparrow Passer montanus 180
Eastern Yellow Wagtail Motacilla tschutschensis 3
White Wagtail M. alba 17
Richard’s Pipit Anthus richardi 1
Buff-bellied Pipit A. rubescens 12
Chestnut-eared Bunting Emberiza fucata 15
Little Bunting E. pusilla 2
Yellow-breasted Bunting E. aureola 1
Black-faced Bunting E. spodocephala 7
Pallas’s Reed Bunting E. pallasi 20
Japanese Reed Bunting E. yessoensis 1

List 2 of 2 for Sat. 19 Nov. 2016 (20 species). Shanghai Binhai Forest Park (Shànghǎi Bīnhǎi Sēnlín Gōngyuán [上海滨海森林公园]; 30.966324, 121.910289), a green space in Pudong, Shanghai, China. Cloudy, hazy/smoggy. Low 16° C, high 22° C. Humidity 72%. Visibility: 10 km. Wind N 11 km/h. PM2.5 AQI: 200 (very unhealthful). Sunrise 06:26, sunset 16:53. SUN 19 NOV 2016 09:40-10:40. Craig Brelsford, Elaine Du, & Michael Grunwell.

Common Pheasant Phasianus colchicus 1
Grey Heron Ardea cinerea 1
Black-crowned Night Heron Nycticorax nycticorax 1
Spotted Dove Streptopelia chinensis 10
Long-tailed Shrike Lanius schach 1
Light-vented Bulbul Pycnonotus sinensis 50
Yellow-browed Warbler Phylloscopus inornatus 1
Crested Myna Acridotheres cristatellus 10
White-cheeked Starling Spodiopsar cineraceus 100
White’s Thrush Zoothera aurea 1
Pale Thrush Turdus pallidus 2
Dusky Thrush T. eunomus 25
Red-flanked Bluetail Tarsiger cyanurus 20
Mugimaki Flycatcher Ficedula mugimaki 1
Daurian Redstart Phoenicurus auroreus 15
Eurasian Tree Sparrow Passer montanus 50
White Wagtail Motacilla alba leucopsis 2
Olive-backed Pipit Anthus hodgsoni 2
Buff-bellied Pipit A. rubescens 15
Chinese Grosbeak Eophona migratoria 1

First Mainland Shanghai Record of Hooded Crane

Editor’s note: The photo above shows Hooded Crane flying above fields at Nanhui on 12 Nov. 2016. Before our sighting, Grus monacha had never been recorded on the Shanghai Peninsula. Each year, about 100 Hooded Crane overwinter on eastern Chongming Island, 60 km north of Nanhui at the mouth of the Yangtze River.

Elaine Du and I birded three of the four days between Sat. 12 Nov. and Tues. 15 Nov. 2016. We noted 105 species. On Saturday we had the first-ever record in Nanhui of Hooded Crane. We also found Baikal Teal on Saturday as well as Greater White-fronted Goose, Tundra Swan, and Jack Snipe. Sunday was also spent at the coastal site in Pudong and gave us calling Brown-cheeked Rail as well as Hair-crested Drongo and late Rufous-tailed Robin. Other weekend Nanhui records were Endangered Black-faced Spoonbill holding steady at the defunct nature reserve (30.920500, 121.973167), Amur Falcon feasting on gnats small enough for leaf warblers, an uncommon Shanghai record of Water Pipit, and two more sightings of Endangered Yellow-breasted Bunting at its increasingly reliable site (30.850707, 121.863662). On Tuesday at Shanghai’s Zhongshan Park (31.221888, 121.420066) we had a very late Narcissus Flycatcher.

ELAINE’S FEAT OF BIRDING

The flyby sighting of Hooded Crane was Elaine’s finest hour. Michael Grunwell was in the back seat and, blinded by the roof, would have never seen the crane. I was busy driving along a very uncertain dirt track. We see so many Grey Heron at Nanhui, and it is so easy to disregard them, and sure enough two of the three birds flying together were Grey Heron. But one was not, and Elaine caught it.

Elaine got her first pair of binoculars in 2013 and is now making big discoveries. “You’ve come a long way, baby!”

Thanks to Shanghai birder Xiao Cao for his knowledge of species histories in Shanghai. It was he who told us that our Hooded Crane was a first record for mainland Shanghai.

JACK SNIPE AT IRON TRACK

Michael Grunwell, Iron Track, 5 Nov. 2016. Photo by Craig Brelsford.
Michael Grunwell at Iron Track (31.003613, 121.907883), 5 Nov. 2016. The reed beds around Iron Track line the Dazhi River and are a remnant of the habitat that used to cover the area. The reed bed is unlikely to be developed and provides excellent habitat for Reed Parrotbill and wintering Chestnut-eared Bunting and Jack Snipe. The latter species was found 12 Nov. 2016 by our group.

The experience with Jack Snipe occurred Saturday near dark at Iron Track (31.003613, 121.907883). Our partner Michael Grunwell, Elaine, and I were looking for Brown-cheeked Rail. The snipe sneezed when flushed, flew to a towering height in a tighter formation than is typical in Common Snipe, and after all the fuss ended up landing only 150 m from where they had started.

When the snipe began their flight, I figured they were Common and continued looking for rails. Then I heard Michael cry out, “Possible Jack!” The snipe flew directly over us. The bill was noticeably shorter than the bill of the Common I have come to know. Elaine too saw the short bill.

The three of us feel confident in our record of Jack Snipe and urge others to be on the lookout for this species. Get pictures if you can.

Another look at Iron Track area, looking back toward the road.
Another view of Iron Track, looking back toward the road.

Iron Track is part of the extensive reed-bed habitat lining the Dazhi River (大治河). It provides excellent habitat for Chinese Pond Heron, White-breasted Waterhen, Brown-cheeked Rail (and possibly Water Rail), wintering Bluethroat, and wintering Jack Snipe. Reed Parrotbill is resident.

The beds are on either side of the river, are unlikely to be developed, and are in good condition. They are a remnant of the habitat that used to cover the entire area.

YELLOW-BREASTED BUNTING IN SHANGHAI

Yellow-breasted Bunting at site north of Luchao, 12 Nov. 2016.
Yellow-breasted Bunting at site north of Luchao, 12 Nov. 2016.

As reported above, on Saturday with Michael and yet again on Sunday our site near Luchao delivered Yellow-breasted Bunting. The site is at 30.850694, 121.863667. We are now five-for-five in sightings of Yellow-breasted Bunting since our Nov. 5 discovery of the species there.

It will be interesting to see how long into the winter the Yellow-breasted Bunting remain. I hope they stay awhile, because it is unlikely any of the locals will catch ’n’ roast ’em. (The greatest factor in the endangerment of Emberiza aureola is massive poaching of the species for snacks in south China.)

Recently the site has yielded Black-browed Reed Warbler and Chestnut-eared Bunting and a late record of Barn Swallow. An un-ID’d rail has been spotted twice in the area.

To get to the site, from Luchao drive 1.5 km north from the bend in the road north of the canal, where the road begins to run parallel with the sea. Pull onto the unpaved track and park on the bridge of white cement. The buntings seem to be concentrated a few dozen meters south, near the place where picnickers dumped a big load of trash. Be on the lookout for individuals flying into the narrow reed bed after foraging runs in the adjacent rice paddies.

ID’ING BROWN-CHEEKED RAIL ON CALL

On Sunday at Nanhui we positively identified 2 Brown-cheeked Rail on call. Here is the recording I made (00:28; 2.7 MB):

The pitch matches closely the pitch in the recordings by Anon Torimi of rails assigned to Rallus indicus. I downloaded Torimi’s recordings from xeno-canto.org. I invite Shanghai birders to do the same. Get to know the sounds of both R. indicus and the extralimital R. aquaticus and start adding these species to your own Shanghai lists.

AMUR FALCON CATCHING GNATS

Amur Falcon catching gnats at Nanhui, 12 Nov. 2016.
Amur Falcon catching gnats at Nanhui, 12 Nov. 2016.

On Saturday we were amazed to see Amur Falcon catching flies with their talons. We had five near Big Bend (31.000321, 121.938074). In top left of the three-panel photo above, the falcon has spotted its prey and is accelerating toward it. In bottom left, the gnat is visible as the falcon zeroes in. At right, the falcon raises its talons for its tiny prey.

The instinct to use its talons is inefficient in this case and shows that Amur Falcon has evolved to hunt larger game. Smaller aerialists such as swifts, nightjars, swallows, and flycatchers snatch up their prey directly with the mouth.

PREACHING THE GOSPEL OF CONSERVATIONISM

Craig talks to Pudong TV about the opportunities for conservation at Nanhui. Photo by Elaine Du.
Craig talks to Pudong TV about the opportunities for conservation at Nanhui. Photo by Elaine Du.

I saw the car with lettering saying “Pudong TV” and waved the journalists over. I told them I had something they might want to hear. Echoing my recent post Save Nanhui, I told the pair that Shanghai can have it all. It can be a world financial hub and China’s greatest metropolis and be a green city. It can follow Hong Kong and Singapore and develop a world-class urban wetland reserve easily accessible to nature lovers without their own car. Nanhui’s old wetland, I said, pointing to the defunct reserve behind us, could be the site of such a reserve.

As I talked, a small crowd gathered. Most seemed supportive of my ideas. I was not surprised. A world-class wetland at Nanhui is a basic conservationist idea, and basic conservationist ideas have broad appeal.

UNUSUAL APPEARANCE OF NARCISSUS FLYCATCHER

Photographers assemble before a setup designed to attract a male Naricissus Flycatcher at Zhongshan Park, 15 Nov. 2016.
Photographers assemble before a setup designed to attract a male Naricissus Flycatcher at Shanghai’s Zhongshan Park, 15 Nov. 2016.

A male Narcissus Flycatcher made a rare late-autumn Shanghai appearance in Zhongshan Park (31.221888, 121.420066). On Tues. 15 Nov., the spectacle attracted 30 photographers.

The flycatcher was attracted by mealworms speared by photographers onto a soft steel wire. The wire was hung from a branch, enticing the flycatcher to hover to snatch the bait. The bird was appearing every 10 minutes.

I expressed concern but did not feel the need to be critical or intervene. The photographers obviously liked the flycatcher, did not think that they were harming it, and were enjoying themselves immensely.

I watched the flycatcher attack the mealworms. I think it unlikely that the wire would harm the bird. The bigger problem may be that the free protein will keep the bird here an unnaturally long time. A passage migrant through Earth’s largest city, Narcissus Flycatcher should be in Borneo by now.

INTERESTING WECHAT EXCHANGE ON ARCTIC WARBLER

Join Shanghai Birding for the very latest bird sightings in Shanghai.
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Shanghai Birding is the WeChat companion to shanghaibirding.com. In it, we exchange real-time reports and engage in discussions about birding in Shanghai and all China.

A discussion on 10 Nov. about Arctic Warbler showed the utility to birders of social media in general and Shanghai Birding in particular. Members Jonathan Martinez (based in Shenzhen) and Paul Holt (based in Beijing) shared their knowledge about Arctic Warbler and its sister species. In so doing, they shed light on the situation, still very imperfectly understood, of the Arctic-type complex in Shanghai.

Holt led off:

Paul Holt (PH): I see from a recent posting that @李伟 photographed an Arctic Warbler at Nanhui on the 28 October. Great images! Isn’t that extremely late? The latest ever Beijing record’s over two weeks earlier than that.

I then posted a long list of my Arctic-type records from autumn 2014 and autumn 2015. In the list, I bunched together all members of the Arctic Warbler Complex (Arctic Warbler Phylloscopus borealis borealis and P. b. kennicotti, Kamchatka Leaf Warbler P. examinandus, and Japanese Leaf Warbler P. xanthodryas). I list all three species because, although it is presumed that the vast majority of spring and autumn records in Shanghai pertain to borealis, it is far from certain what the proportions are. (Arctic Warbler and its sister species are nearly impossible to separate on morphology but are distinguishable by voice.)

The latest autumn record I had of an Arctic-type warbler was 24 Oct. (2015).

Holt wrote back:

PH: Thanks @Craig (大山雀) Unless I’m missing something 28 October is later than any of the records you cite (but just by four days). Could it be that the Nanhui sighting is Shanghai’s latest ever? Also it’s interesting that you mention all three species. Have any of your region’s Arctic-types been identified to a species other than borealis?

Shanghai's Big 5 Leaf Warblers: Pale-legged Leaf Warbler (1), Arctic Warbler (2), Eastern Crowned Warbler (3), Pallas's Leaf Warbler (4), and Yellow-browed Warbler (5).
Leaf warblers are a tough group and are a perennial source of discussion in the Shanghai Birding WeChat group as well as on shanghaibirding.com. On 26 Sept. 2016, shanghaibirding.com published a study of Shanghai’s Big 5 Leaf Warblers: Pale-legged Leaf Warbler (1), Arctic Warbler (2), Eastern Crowned Warbler (3), Pallas’s Leaf Warbler (4), and Yellow-browed Warbler (5).

Craig Brelsford (CB): @Paul Holt I have not recorded anything other than borealis around Shanghai. (All confirmed borealis records are of individuals singing in spring.) I also suspect that a record of xanthodryas is next to impossible in Shanghai. I am aware that citing all three names is not a perfect solution. I list all three species because I believe information is insufficient. No one knows how many Arctic-type in Shanghai are borealis and how many examinandus. Very basic facts about the species in east-central China are unclear. Maybe someday studies will confirm that an Arctic-type in east-central China is borealis, with a probability of 99%. In that case, I would probably assign any silent Arctic-type I saw to borealis. Do you have any suggestions?

A few minutes later, I added:

CB: Just remembered that Michael Grunwell, Elaine Du, and I had Arctic-type this past Sat. 5 Nov. We got a good look at the bird, too. October was a warm, wet month in Shanghai, and the entire fall migration season seems to be late a week or two. Would others here agree?

PH: I’ve never seen xanthodryas in mainland China, have only ever encountered two examinandus (which were the first records for Liaoning & Hebei. Both sound recorded) here & have too little to go on I’m afraid @Craig (大山雀). Personally I log everything as Arctic Warbler by default, though that’s far from perfect. Until more of us work on this awkward group & make an effort to sound-record them, it’ll be a long time yet before a truer picture of their patterns of occurrence emerges. Cracking late record last weekend @Craig (大山雀). Surely that must be a good candidate for being the latest ever.

CB: @Paul Holt Maybe for simplicity’s sake I should log everything as Arctic. I have hesitated because I dislike speculation, and besides your very reliable records from up north I have little else to go on.

At this Martinez came in with his south-China perspective:

Jonathan Martinez (JM): I’ve heard xanthodryas on Fujian coast in early May and had a bird caught in October at Xitou identified as xanthodryas by DNA on tail feathers among about 15 borealis. I found an examinandus in central Guangxi in September, first suspected by call on a bird wave and clearly identified with call a few days later. I suspect examinandus is not a coastal migrant and probably goes through mainland China. I think still the only species recorded in Hong Kong is borealis, despite many looking for these.

CB: Thanks! With a confirmed xanthodryas in Fujian and examinandus only “suspected” not to use the Chinese coast, I’ll keep my clunky three-species listing. Arctic-type Warbler in China is a subject crying out for more research.

CAPE NANHUI

'Cape Nanhui' is the southeastern-most point of Pudong (red) and the city-province of Shanghai. Map courtesy Wikipedia. By Mikey641 - File:China Shanghai location map.svg, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=50893597
‘Cape Nanhui’ is the southeastern-most point of Pudong (red) and the city-province of Shanghai (yellow). The Shanghai Peninsula could be construed to be the mainland areas of Shanghai. Map courtesy Wikipedia.

Did you know that the birding area at Nanhui is a cape? This is an aspect of Nanhui that perhaps requires more discussion. The 30-km stretch of coastline is the southeastern-most point of Pudong as well as of the entire city-province of Shanghai.

Cape Nanhui (I like the ring of that) juts out between the mouth of the Yangtze River and Hangzhou Bay. The cape aspect of Nanhui makes it even more valuable to migrating birds than regular coastline. Nanhui is a stepping stone, catching birds that have just made a non-stop crossing of the mouth of the Yangtze River (in fall) or a non-stop crossing of Hangzhou Bay (in spring).

I also find it interesting that one never hears of the “Shanghai Peninsula.” It’s a term with explanatory power. Although rather nubby, the Shanghai Peninsula is clearly a promontory between the mouth of the Yangtze River and Hangzhou Bay. Cape Nanhui is the tip of the promontory.

If conservationists talk about a nature reserve for “Cape Nanhui,” the tip of the “Shanghai Peninsula,” then maybe they will have a stronger case.

A NOTE FROM TOMMY PEDERSEN

Tommy Pedersen is a pilot with Emirates. He is Norwegian and has been based in Dubai for many years. An accomplished birder, Tommy created uaebirding.com. This outstanding site is the best introduction to birding in the United Arab Emirates and the Arabian Peninsula.

Tommy recently sent a message to shanghaibirding.com:

I had a work flight to Shanghai 9-11 November 2016, and following Craig’s excellent site, I decided to visit Nanhui.

I booked a room at Holiday Inn Express (no English spoken, cold and drafty rooms), close to the Magic Parking Lot and Nanhui Nature Reserve. Two targets: Saunders’s Gull and Reed Parrotbill.

On Day 1, 9 November, I was extremely lucky and bumped into Craig and Elaine with Erica, who took me to the nature reserve. We had a jolly good time (at least I was), and Saunders’s Gulls were soon spotted (http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S32503941).

Day 2 saw me walking 16 km in total, enjoying a near windless morning with massive migration overhead. It was magic: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S32503940

Hope to be back soon

Tommy Pedersen
www.uaebirding.com

Day Lists
Lists are generated on eBird then adjusted to comport with my first reference, the IOC World Bird List.

List 1 of 1 for Sat. 12 Nov. 2016 (80 species)

Michael Grunwell and Elaine Du view Baikal Teal on the coastal road at Nanhui, 12 Nov. 2016.
Michael Grunwell and Elaine Du view Baikal Teal on coastal road at Nanhui, 12 Nov. 2016.

Birds noted around Pudong Nanhui Dongtan Wetland (Pǔdōng Nánhuì Dōngtān Shīdì [浦东南汇东滩湿地]; 30.920507, 121.973159), Pudong, Shanghai, China. List includes birds found at Dishui Lake (30.908702, 121.945124). We covered the coastal road from Binhai (Bīnhǎi Zhèn [滨海镇]; 31.006250, 121.885558) to Luchao (Lúcháo Gǎng [芦潮港]; 30.851109, 121.848455). Among the points along this 30 km stretch are Iron Track (31.003613, 121.907883), Big Bend (31.000321, 121.938074), Microforest 4 (30.953225, 121.959083), Microforest 1 (30.923889, 121.971635), Magic Parking Lot (30.884898, 121.968229), Magic GPS Point (30.880563, 121.964551), South Lock (30.860073, 121.909997), Eiffel Tower (30.850531, 121.878047), & the Marshy Agricultural Land (30.850707, 121.863662). Partly cloudy. Low 12° C, high 21° C. Humidity 60%. Visibility: 10 km. Wind SSW 23 km/h. PM2.5 AQI: 85 (moderate). Sunrise 06:20, sunset 16:57. SAT 12 NOV 2016 06:40-17:00. Craig Brelsford, Elaine Du, & Michael Grunwell.

Greater White-fronted Goose Anser albifrons 48
Tundra Swan Cygnus columbianus bewickii 14
Gadwall Anas strepera 8
Falcated Duck A. falcata 3
Eurasian Wigeon A. penelope 160
Mallard A. platyrhynchos 130
Eastern Spot-billed Duck A. zonorhyncha ca. 800
Northern Shoveler A. clypeata 70
Northern Pintail A. acuta 60
Baikal Teal A. formosa 40
Eurasian Teal A. crecca 50
Common Pochard Aythya ferina 2
Tufted Duck A. fuligula 50
Greater Scaup A. marila 8
Common Pheasant Phasianus colchicus 7
Little Grebe Tachybaptus ruficollis 25
Great Cormorant Eurasian Phalacrocorax carbo 75
Grey Heron Ardea cinerea 150
Great Egret A. alba 15
Intermediate Egret A. intermedia 1
Little Egret Egretta garzetta 30
Eastern Cattle Egret Bubulcus coromandus 1
Chinese Pond Heron Ardeola bacchus 2
Black-crowned Night Heron Nycticorax nycticorax 3
Eurasian Spoonbill Platalea leucorodia 16
Black-faced Spoonbill P. minor 3
Eurasian/Black-faced Spoonbill P. leucorodia/minor 53
Western Osprey Pandion haliaetus 1
Eastern Marsh Harrier Circus spilonotus 2
Hen Harrier C. cyaneus 1
Eastern Buzzard Buteo japonicus 1
Common Moorhen Gallinula chloropus 4
Eurasian Coot Fulica atra 30
Hooded Crane Grus monacha 1
Kentish Plover Charadrius alexandrinus 1
Black-tailed Godwit Limosa limosa 1
Sanderling Calidris alba 1
Dunlin C. alpina 8
Jack Snipe Lymnocryptes minimus 8
Common Snipe Gallinago gallinago 3
Common Sandpiper Actitis hypoleucos 5
Green Sandpiper Tringa ochropus 3
Spotted Redshank T. erythropus 250
Common Greenshank T. nebularia 30
Vega Gull Larus vegae vegae/L. v. mongolicus 4
Feral Pigeon (Rock Dove) Columba livia 2
Oriental Turtle Dove Streptopelia orientalis 3
Spotted Dove S. chinensis 2
Common Kingfisher Alcedo atthis 1
Common Kestrel Falco tinnunculus 1
Amur Falcon F. amurensis 6
Long-tailed Shrike Lanius schach 35
Chinese Penduline Tit Remiz consobrinus 30
Light-vented Bulbul Pycnonotus sinensis 6
Pallas’s Leaf Warbler Phylloscopus proregulus 4
Yellow-browed Warbler P. inornatus 1
Zitting Cisticola Cisticola juncidis 1
Plain Prinia Prinia inornata 6
Reed Parrotbill Paradoxornis heudei 16
Vinous-throated Parrotbill Sinosuthora webbiana 40
Crested Myna Acridotheres cristatellus 30
Red-billed Starling Spodiopsar sericeus 1
White-cheeked Starling S. cineraceus 6
White’s Thrush Zoothera aurea 1
Japanese Thrush Turdus cardis 3
Pale Thrush T. pallidus 6
Dusky Thrush T. eunomus 2
Red-flanked Bluetail Tarsiger cyanurus 1
Daurian Redstart Phoenicurus auroreus 13
Stejneger’s Stonechat Saxicola stejnegeri 2
Eurasian Tree Sparrow Passer montanus 50
Eastern Yellow Wagtail Motacilla tschutschensis 11 (10 taivana, 1 tschutschensis)
White Wagtail M. alba 15 (1 ocularis)
Olive-backed Pipit Anthus hodgsoni 1
Water Pipit A. spinoletta 1
Buff-bellied Pipit A. rubescens 12
Brambling Fringilla montifringilla 1
Chestnut-eared Bunting Emberiza fucata 21
Yellow-breasted Bunting E. aureola 5
Black-faced Bunting E. spodocephala 3
Pallas’s Reed Bunting E. pallasi 56

List 1 of 1 for Sun. 13 Nov. 2016 (69 species)

Rufous-tailed Robin <em>Larvivora sibilans</em>, record for Shanghai. 13 Nov. 2016, Microforest 4, Nanhui.
Rufous-tailed Robin Larvivora sibilans, late record for Shanghai. 13 Nov. 2016, Microforest 4 (30.953225, 121.959083), Nanhui.

Birds noted around Pudong Nanhui Dongtan Wetland (Pǔdōng Nánhuì Dōngtān Shīdì [浦东南汇东滩湿地]; 30.920507, 121.973159), Pudong, Shanghai, China. List does not include Dishui Lake (30.908702, 121.945124), which was shrouded in fog. We covered the coastal road from Binhai (Bīnhǎi Zhèn [滨海镇]; 31.006250, 121.885558) to Luchao (Lúcháo Gǎng [芦潮港]; 30.851109, 121.848455). Among the points along this 30 km stretch are Iron Track (31.003613, 121.907883), Big Bend (31.000321, 121.938074), Microforest 4 (30.953225, 121.959083), Microforest 1 (30.923889, 121.971635), Magic Parking Lot (30.884898, 121.968229), Magic GPS Point (30.880563, 121.964551), South Lock (30.860073, 121.909997), Eiffel Tower (30.850531, 121.878047), & the Marshy Agricultural Land (30.850707, 121.863662). Cloudy, foggy, with intermittent drizzle. Sunrise 06:20, sunset 16:57. SUN 13 NOV 2016 06:40-16:40. Craig Brelsford, Elaine Du, & Cezary Raczko.

Gadwall Anas strepera 8
Eurasian Wigeon A. penelope 30
Mallard A. platyrhynchos 8
Eastern Spot-billed Duck A. zonorhyncha 150
Northern Shoveler A. clypeata 2
Tufted Duck Aythya fuligula 1
Common Pheasant Phasianus colchicus 4
Little Grebe Tachybaptus ruficollis 25
Great Cormorant Eurasian Phalacrocorax carbo 40
Eurasian Bittern Botaurus stellaris 1
Grey Heron Ardea cinerea 100
Great Egret A. alba 30
Little Egret Egretta garzetta 60
Eastern Cattle Egret Bubulcus coromandus 1
Black-crowned Night Heron Nycticorax nycticorax 1
Eurasian Spoonbill Platalea leucorodia 17
Black-faced Spoonbill P. minor 15
Eurasian/Black-faced Spoonbill P. leucorodia/minor 30
Brown-cheeked Rail Rallus indicus 2
Water/Brown-cheeked Rail R. aquaticus/indicus 3
White-breasted Waterhen Amaurornis phoenicurus 1
Common Moorhen Gallinula chloropus 3
Eurasian Coot Fulica atra 4
Pied Avocet Recurvirostra avosetta 3
Kentish Plover Charadrius alexandrinus 1
Common Snipe Gallinago gallinago 14
Common Sandpiper Actitis hypoleucos 1
Green Sandpiper Tringa ochropus 2
Spotted Redshank T. erythropus 80
Common Greenshank T. nebularia 5
Feral Pigeon (Rock Dove) Columba livia 1
Oriental Turtle Dove Streptopelia orientalis 3
Spotted Dove S. chinensis 3
Common Kestrel Falco tinnunculus 3
Amur Falcon F. amurensis 1
Peregrine Falcon F. peregrinus 1
Falco sp. 2
Long-tailed Shrike Lanius schach 40
Hair-crested Drongo Dicrurus hottentottus 1
Eurasian/Oriental Skylark Alauda arvensis/gulgula 1 singing
Barn Swallow Hirundo rustica 8
Yellow-bellied Tit Periparus venustulus 4
Chinese Penduline Tit Remiz consobrinus 20
Light-vented Bulbul Pycnonotus sinensis 25
Brown-flanked Bush Warbler Horornis fortipes 1
Pallas’s Leaf Warbler Phylloscopus proregulus 18
Yellow-browed Warbler P. inornatus 4
Black-browed Reed Warbler Acrocephalus bistrigiceps 1
Plain Prinia Prinia inornata 4
Reed Parrotbill Paradoxornis heudei 18
Vinous-throated Parrotbill Sinosuthora webbiana 35
Japanese White-eye Zosterops japonicus 2
Crested Myna Acridotheres cristatellus 10
White’s Thrush Zoothera aurea 7
Japanese Thrush Turdus cardis 5
Eyebrowed Thrush T. obscurus 2
Pale Thrush T. pallidus 6
Dusky Thrush T. eunomus 4
Rufous-tailed Robin Larvivora sibilans 1
Red-flanked Bluetail Tarsiger cyanurus 19
Daurian Redstart Phoenicurus auroreus 18
Stejneger’s Stonechat Saxicola stejnegeri 2
Eurasian Tree Sparrow Passer montanus 150
Eastern Yellow Wagtail Motacilla tschutschensis taivana 8
White Wagtail M. alba 14
Buff-bellied Pipit Anthus rubescens 80
Chestnut-eared Bunting Emberiza fucata 7
Rustic Bunting E. rustica 2
Yellow-throated Bunting E. elegans 3
Yellow-breasted Bunting E. aureola 3
Black-faced Bunting E. spodocephala 14
Pallas’s Reed Bunting E. pallasi 16

List 1 of 1 for Tues. 15 Nov. 2016 (16 species). Zhongshan Park (Zhōngshān Gōngyuán [中山公园]; 31.221888, 121.420066), urban green space in Changning District, Shanghai. Partly cloudy. Low 12° C, high 17° C. Humidity 62%. Visibility 10 km. Wind NE 23 km/h. PM2.5 AQI: 93 (moderate). Sunrise 06:22, sunset 16:55. TUE 15 NOV 2016 13:00-15:00. Craig Brelsford & Elaine Du.

Spotted Dove Streptopelia chinensis 5
Common Kingfisher Alcedo atthis 1
Long-tailed Shrike Lanius schach 2
Japanese Tit Parus minor 2
Light-vented Bulbul Pycnonotus sinensis 30
Pallas’s Leaf Warbler Phylloscopus proregulus 4
Yellow-browed Warbler P. inornatus 1
Chinese Hwamei Garrulax canorus 3
Grey-backed Thrush Turdus hortulorum 1
Chinese Blackbird T. mandarinus 4
Eyebrowed Thrush T. obscurus 3
Oriental Magpie-Robin Copsychus saularis 3
Red-flanked Bluetail Tarsiger cyanurus 4
Narcissus Flycatcher Ficedula narcissina 1
Eurasian Tree Sparrow Passer montanus 20
White Wagtail Motacilla alba leucopsis 2